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Suppose I have a navigation menu that works by using Javascript to hide or show the respective div.

<ul>
<li><a href="#home">Home</a></li>
<li><a href="#contact">Contact Me</a></li>
</ul>

<script>

$("#tabs a").click(function(e){
    e.preventDefault();
    $(".toggle").hide();
    var toShow = $(this).attr('href');
    $(toShow).show();
});

</script>

I know I should be using the <noscript></noscript> tag to facilitate users who do not have Javascript enabled.

Question

How should I go about doing this?

For javascript disabled users, I want to allow them to click "Home" or "Contact Me" and be taken to "home.php" or "contact.php" respectively.

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You could do only one page as well for users with disabled JS and clicking the link will only trigger scrolling to element with proper id attribute. –  Jan.J Dec 5 '12 at 12:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This should work:

<ul>
<li><a data-target="#home" href="home.php">Home</a></li>
<li><a data-target="#contact" href="contact.php">Contact Me</a></li>
</ul>

<script>

$("#tabs a").click(function(e){
    e.preventDefault();
    $(".toggle").hide();
    var toShow = $(this).data('target');
    $(toShow).show();
});

</script>

With noscript you can add another menu, but can't change available one. Having something like above, people with no js will not trigger click handler and default get will be executed. If js is enabled, click function will be executed and e.preventDefault will stop browser from redirect to another page.

This solution also does not require duplicated menus. Once you need to change it somehow, you will need to change HTML of two menus actually, not one.

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Tested - it works. Perfect! Thanks! +1 –  Legendre Dec 5 '12 at 12:14
    
Nice and clean. –  Mark Rhodes Dec 5 '12 at 12:20
    
Nice! What is the data-target option, how does it work? Will it validate? And how does it get into the data object? Ok, I'll google it... ;) Cool. + –  FrancescoMM Dec 5 '12 at 13:13
1  
@FrancescoMM dev.w3.org/html5/spec/… data-* is a new html5 feature for custom attributes. Plus, you can put there an object in JSON and jQuery.data will return you an object, not a text. (not sure if it is default browser feature) –  FAngel Dec 5 '12 at 13:45
1  
@FrancescoMM jQuery should handle it fine. Not sure about IE6, but I'm working with IE7 and higher and use this feature frequently. Had no problem with it yet. –  FAngel Dec 5 '12 at 22:08

Like this:

<ul id="scriptMenu" style="display:none">
    <li><a href="#home">Home</a></li>
    <li><a href="#contact">Contact Me</a></li>
</ul>

<noscript>
    <ul>
        <li><a href="home.php">Home</a></li>
        <li><a href="contact.php">Contact Me</a></li>
    </ul>
</noscript>

<script>
    $(function(){
        $("#scriptMenu").show()
    });
</script>

scriptMenu will be hidden on browsers that don't support JavaScript.
Browsers that do support JavaScript will not render the elements in the tag, and will show the scriptMenu list.

Working example

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Suppose here $($("#scriptMenu").show());you mean $(function() {$("#scriptMenu").show()});. –  FAngel Dec 5 '12 at 12:14
    
@FAngel: Whoops, yup. –  Cerbrus Dec 5 '12 at 12:17
    
@FAngel No, there is no need to defer the execution till the DOM is loaded, you can skip `$(function() {}) as the script tag is below the scriptMenu –  FrancescoMM Dec 5 '12 at 13:08

What about adding the actual link as the href in the "a" tag, and then in the jQuery add return false at the end. This stops the browser executing the link specified in the href element if the Javascript was triggered. If Javascript isn't enabled they just link to the href element. No need for noscript.

<ul>
<li><a href="home.php">Home</a></li>
<li><a href="contact.php">Contact Me</a></li>
</ul>

<script>
$("#tabs a").click(function(e){
    e.preventDefault();
    $(".toggle").hide();
    var toShow = $(this).attr('href');
    $(toShow).show();
    return false;
});    
</script>
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but this will do $("home.php").show(); that won't work. You have to remove ".php" from toShow and add the "#" before to keep the same behaviour –  FrancescoMM Dec 5 '12 at 12:12
    
Agreed - you can manipulate the location as you have done. I was more trying to demonstrate that you don't need to do a noscript solution ... as you did! –  Chris Lewis Dec 5 '12 at 12:14
1  
I've voted yours up as I think it's the best demonstration. I hadn't realised there was a preventDefault in there already ... –  Chris Lewis Dec 5 '12 at 12:23
    
Thanks, I upvoted the accepted solution cause I liked the data-target option –  FrancescoMM Dec 5 '12 at 13:15

Please note that this is a quick trial, code is UNTESTED

Leave the links to the full pages in the anchors, and remove the ".php" programmatically

<ul>
<li><a href="home.php">Home</a></li>
<li><a href="contact.php">Contact Me</a></li>
</ul>

<script>

$("#tabs a").click(function(e){
    e.preventDefault();
    $(".toggle").hide();
    var toShow = $(this).attr('href');
    toShow=toShow.split(".");
    toShow=toShow[0];
    $("#"+toShow).show();
});

</script>
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