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i need to make two different ajax calls and pass both the json data to another function. how can i do it using below ajax call format?

$.ajax({ 
    url:'',
    type:'GET',
    dataType: 'json',
    success: callme
}); 

$.ajax({ 
    url:'',
    type:'GET',
    dataType: 'json',
    success: callme
});

function callme(JSON1,JSON2){
}
share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is the perfect use case for $.when (assuming you're using jQuery):

var ajax1 = $.ajax({ 
    url:'',
    type:'GET',
    dataType: 'json'
});    

var ajax2 = $.ajax({ 
    url:'',
    type:'GET',
    dataType: 'json'
});

$.when(ajax1, ajax2).done(function(json1, json2) {
    // both requests succeeded    
}).fail(function(){
    // one or both requests failed
});

The done callback will only be called when both requests have completed successfully; the fail callback will be called if any request fails.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, great use of $.when. –  davidethell Dec 5 '12 at 12:32
    
+1 This is pretty nice :) –  SnapGravy Dec 5 '12 at 12:32

You can make the ajax as synchronize call by setting the async property as false. so that after callme function would be called after succeding both the requests.

var JSON1, JSON2
$.ajax({ 
   url: url,
   type:'GET',
   dataType: 'json',
   async: false,
   success: function(data){JSON1=data}
 });    

$.ajax({ 
   url: url,
   type:'GET',
   dataType: 'json',
   async: false
   success: function(data){JSON2=data}
});

callme(JSON1,JSON2);

function callme(JSON1,JSON2){
}

Thats it.

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1  
This will never work, as callme will get called before the AJAX call results arrive. –  Alexander Pavlov Dec 5 '12 at 12:26
    
That is avoided by setting the property async: false in the ajax query –  ADITHYAN Dec 5 '12 at 16:22
    
Ah, sorry, missed that... –  Alexander Pavlov Dec 5 '12 at 19:28

My idea here would be to create a getData function you can pass a url to it and have a callback. In the last callback do callme() passing both returned data objects.

function callme(JSON1, JSON2) {}

function getData(url, fn) {
    $.ajax({
        url: url,
        type: "GET",
        dataType: "json",
        success: fn
    });
}

getData("url", function(JSON1) {
    getData("url", function(JSON2) {
        callme(JSON1, JSON2);
    });
});
share|improve this answer
    
Why not simply write success: fn, no need for that anonymous function in the getData function IMO. –  Elias Van Ootegem Dec 5 '12 at 12:38
    
Good question, when I think about it like that it makes much more sense :D –  SnapGravy Dec 5 '12 at 12:39

You can't expect two separate ajax calls to be processed simultaneously, doubly so because JS is single threaded (and AJAX calls are asynchronous, lest you specify they're not - but that is to be avoided). Also: You can't expect JS to take into account the number of arguments you specified for any function and know that it shouldn't invoke the function until both arguments have a value.

Lastly: could you specify what your question actually is: you're asking about how to call another function, but in both cases you seem to be passing the same success callback. Could you elaborate on what data both calls are expected to return, and what data you're sending, too?

If you want a function to be called only after both calls were successful, you could use a closure:

var callme = (function()
{
    var JSON1, JSON2;
    return function(response)//this function will receive each response separately
    {
        JSON1 = JSON1 || response;//if JSON1 isn't set, assign current response
        if (JSON1 !== response)
        {//JSON1 was already set, second response is in
            JSON2 = response;
            //code to process both responses at once goes here
            //but make them undefined before returning, if not, a second call won't work as expected
            JSON1 = undefined;
            JSON2 = undefined;
        }
    };
}();
$.ajax({url: 'some/url',
       data: yourData1,
       type: 'GET',
       success: callme});
$.ajax({url: 'second/url',
        data: yourData2,
        type: 'GET',
        success: callme});

Do bear in mind that it's crucial that the closure (callme function) precedes the AJAX call: because of the way callme is assigned a function (as an expression), the function declaration is not hoisted!

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You'll need to chain your functions together so that the first AJAX result calls the second function and the second AJAX result calls the callme function:

$.ajax({ 
    url:',
    type:'GET',
    dataType: 'json',
    success: function(data) {
        $.ajax({ 
            url:',
            type:'GET',
            dataType: 'json',
            success: function(data2) {
                callme(data, data2);
            }
         });
    }
});    
share|improve this answer
    
If you're going to downvote, at least comment as to why? –  davidethell Dec 5 '12 at 12:26

Nest your ajax calls

 $.ajax({ 
    url:',
    type:'GET',
    dataType: 'json',
    success: function(JSON1) {

      $.ajax({ 
        url:',
        type:'GET',
        dataType: 'json',
        success: function(JSON2) {
          callme(JSON1,JSON2);
        }
     });

    }
 });    


function callme(JSON1,JSON2){
}
share|improve this answer
    
This will not run the requests in parallel... –  Alexander Pavlov Dec 5 '12 at 12:22
    
@AlexanderPavlov OP never asked to have the calls in parallel –  bart s Dec 5 '12 at 12:23
    
Fully agree... My guess was that people implicitly look for the most efficient (from one or another standpoint) solutions –  Alexander Pavlov Dec 5 '12 at 12:25
    
Not sure, but +1 for a correct working example. –  davidethell Dec 5 '12 at 12:26
 $.ajax({ 
    url:',
    type:'GET',
    dataType: 'json',
    success: callme1
 });    

  $.ajax({ 
    url:',
    type:'GET',
    dataType: 'json',
    success: callme2
 });

var JSON1;
var JSON2;

function callme1(JSON){
  JSON1 = JSON;
  if (JSON2)
    callme();
}

function callme2(JSON){
  JSON2 = JSON;
  if (JSON1)
    callme();
}

function callme() {
  // Do whatever you need with JSON1 and JSON2.
}
share|improve this answer
    
While this works it requires extra code for variable definitions and functions. It would seem simpler to use anonymous functions and not try to allow for parallel execution. –  davidethell Dec 5 '12 at 12:28
    
@davidethell: anyway, bfavaretto's solution is the best one. –  Alexander Pavlov Dec 5 '12 at 12:29
    
Agreed. Great use of .when. –  davidethell Dec 5 '12 at 12:31
    
+2 for an answer using globals? You've conditioned a lot of people very well, Mr. Pavlov... –  Elias Van Ootegem Dec 5 '12 at 12:40
    
@EliasVanOotegem: thanks for noticing my answer! :) You don't like solutions that are needlessly complex, do you? –  Alexander Pavlov Dec 5 '12 at 12:42

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