Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

does anyone know how to count all numbers or characters in list and print it in pair in this format: (number . number_of_occurrences). For example:

(count '(3 1 3 2 1 2 3 3 3))

((3 . 5) (1 . 2) (2 . 2))

(count '(d b a c b b a))

((d . 1) (b . 3) (a . 2) (c . 1))

Thanks in advance for helping me :)

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's an idea - use a hash table to keep track of the number of occurrences. This is an O(n) procedure:

(define (counter lst)
  (let ((counts (make-hash)))
    (let loop ((lst lst))
      (cond ((null? lst)
             (hash->list counts))
            (else
             (hash-update! counts (car lst) add1
                           (lambda () 0))
             (loop (cdr lst)))))))

Alternatively, here's a simpler version (it doesn't use filter) of @mobyte's solution in Scheme - noticing that this is O(n^2) and hence less efficient than the hash table-based procedure:

(define (counter lst)
  (map (lambda (e)
         (cons e (count (curry equal? e) lst)))
       (remove-duplicates lst)))

Either way, It works as expected:

(counter '(3 1 3 2 1 2 3 3 3))
=> '((3 . 5) (2 . 2) (1 . 2))

(counter '(d b a c b b a))
=> '((b . 3) (a . 2) (d . 1) (c . 1))
share|improve this answer

This is solution in clojure. But I hope it'll be helpful:

(defn counter [l]
  (map (fn [e]
         [e (count (filter #{e} l))])
       (distinct l)))

(counter [3 1 3 2 1 2 3 3 3])
-> ([3 5] [1 2] [2 2])

(counter '(d b a c b b a))
-> ([d 1] [b 3] [a 2] [c 1])
share|improve this answer
    
To be fair, in Clojure one could just do (frequencies [:a :a :b :c :c]) and get {:a 2, :b 1, :c 2} –  Jason Lewis Apr 22 at 14:41
    
@JasonLewis Good to know. The original intention was just to show an idea of the algorithm. –  mobyte Apr 23 at 14:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.