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In JavaScript, I may begin writing a 'library' or collection of functionality using a top level object like this:

window.Lib = (function()
{
    return {

        // Define Lib here.
        //

    };

})();

I may also add some functions within Lib which serve to create objects related to it:

window.Lib = (function()
{
    return {

        ObjectA: function()
        {
            var _a = 5;

            return {

                getA: function(){ return _a; }

            };

        },


        ObjectB: function()
        {
            var _b = 2;
            var _c = 1;

            return {

                getB: function(){ return _b; }

            };

        }

    };

})();

Which would be used like so:

var thing = Lib.ObjectA();
var thing2 = Lib.ObjectA();
var thing3 = Lib.ObjectB();

And I can use the methods within each of those created above to get the values of _a defined within ObjectA() or _b defined within ObjectB():

alert(thing.getA()); // 5
alert(thing3.getB()); // 2

What I want to achieve is this:

Say I want to access the property _c (defined within ObjectB()) but only within the scope of Lib. How could I go about that? By this I mean, I want to make the property readable within any function that I define within the object returned by Lib(), but I don't want to expose those values outside of that.

Code example:

window.Lib = (function()
{
    return {

        ObjectA: function(){ ... },
        ObjectB: function(){ ... },

        assess: function(obj)
        {
            // Somehow get _c here.
            alert( obj.getInternalC() );
        }

    };

})();

Which would work like so:

var thing = Lib.ObjectB();
alert( thing.getInternalC() ) // error | null | no method named .getInternalC()

Lib.assess(thing); // 1

Hope this makes sense.

share|improve this question
    
I've added an example to my answer of how you can almost do this. –  T.J. Crowder Dec 5 '12 at 13:38
    
Would John's "makeClass" function be of use here for the instance? ejohn.org/blog/simple-class-instantiation –  Mark Schultheiss Dec 5 '12 at 14:29
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

So you want per-instance protected properties? That is, properties on the instances created by ObjectA, ObjectB, etc., but which are only accessible to the code within your library, and not to code outside it?

You cannot currently do that properly in JavaScript, but you'll be able to in the next version using private name objects. (See "Almost doing it" below for something similar you can do now in ES5, though.)

It's easy to create data that's shared by all code within Lib, but not per-instance properties, like so:

window.Lib = (function()
{
    var sharedData;

    // ...
})();

All of the functions defined within there (your ObjectA, etc.) will have access to that one sharedData variable, which is completely inaccessible from outside. But it's not per-instance, each object created by ObjectA, ObjectB, etc. doesn't get its own copy.

Almost doing it

If your code will be running in an environment with ES5 (so, any modern browser, where "modern" does not include IE8 or earlier), you can have obscured but not actually private properties, via Object.defineProperty. This is similar to how private name objects will work in ES.next, but not genuinely private:

Live Example | Source

window.Lib = (function() {
    // Get a random name for our "c" property
    var c = "__c" + Math.round(Math.random() * 1000000);

    // Return our library functions
    return {

        ObjectA: function() {
            // Create an object with a couple of public proprties:
            var obj = {
                pub1: "I'm a public property",
                pub2: "So am I"
            };

            // Add our obscured "c" property to it, make sure it's
            // non-enumerable (doesn't show up in for-in loops)
            Object.defineProperty(obj, c, {
                enumerable: false,  // false is actually the default value, just emphasizing
                writable:   true,
                value:      "I'm an obscured property"
            });

            // Return it
            return obj;
        },

        ObjectB: function(){ /* ... */ },

        assess: function(obj) {
            // Here, we access the property using the `c` variable, which
            // contains the property name. In JavaScript, you can access
            // properties either using dotted notation and a literal
            // (`foo.propName`), or using bracketed notation and a string
            // (`foo["propName"]`). Here we're using bracketed notation,
            // and our `c` string, which has the actual property name.
            display( obj[c] );
        },


        alter: function(obj, value) {
            // Similarly, we can change the value with code that has
            // access to the `c` variable
            obj[c] = value;
        }
    };
})();

And use it like this:

// Create our object
var o = Lib.ObjectA();

// Play with it
display("pub1: " + o.pub1); // displays "pub1: I'm a public property"
display("c: " + o.c);       // displays "c: undefined" since `o` has no property called `c`
Lib.assess(o);              // displays "I'm an obscured property"

// Note that our obscured property doesn't show up in for-in loops or Object.keys:
var propName, propNames = [];
for (propName in o) {
    propNames.push(propName);
}
display("propNames: " + propNames.join(","));
display("Object.keys: " + Object.keys(o).join(","));

// Our Lib code can modify the property
Lib.alter(o, "Updated obscured property");
Lib.assess(o);

The object returned by Lib.ObjectA has a property whose name will change every time Lib is loaded, and which is not enumerable (doesn't show up in for-in loops). The only way to get at it is to know it's name (which, again, changes every time Lib is created — e.g., every page load). The code within Lib knows what the property name is, because it's in the c variable which is shared by all of the Lib code. Since you can access properties using bracketed notation and a string, we can use instance[c] to access the property.

You see how these are pretty well obscured. Code outside of Lib don't see the obscured property when enumerating the property in the object, and they don't know the semi-random name we assigned it, so can't find the property. Of course, you could find it via inspection using a debugger, but debuggers can do lots of things.

And in fact, this is how private properties will work in ES.next, except that c won't be a string, it'll be a private name object.

share|improve this answer
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Well, you would "just" need to declare those variables within the Context of Lib

window.Lib = (function()
{
    var _c = 42;   

    return {
    };
});

Notice that I removed the automatic invocation of that pseudo constructor function. That means, you would need to create multiple calls to Lib() for multiple instances, each would have its own unique set of values.

var inst1 = Lib(),
    inst2 = Lib();

If you only want to have shared access from all child-context's (functions), you can just use the same pattern you already do (only with moving the var declarations to the parent context like shown above).

share|improve this answer
    
But that's not per-instance. The OP clearly wants per-instance protected properties. –  T.J. Crowder Dec 5 '12 at 13:14
    
@T.J.Crowder: I thought I captured that. -- Well, I only captured it very "globally" by re-calling the whole constructor thing. So yea, might be not the real deal. –  jAndy Dec 5 '12 at 13:17
    
@ jAndy: No, look again at the OP's question and in particular at the code. The goal is for Lib to be created once, and to have ObjectA, ObjectB, etc., create instances of objects, but to have all of the code within Lib be able to access properties on those instances that cannot be accessed from the outside world. –  T.J. Crowder Dec 5 '12 at 13:22
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