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This question reminded me of an old unanswered question in my mind about switch:

    int personType = 1;
    switch (personType)
    {
        case 1:
            Employee emp = new Employee();
            emp.ExperienceInfo();
            break;
        case 2:
            Employee emp = new Employee(); 
            //Error: A local variable named 'emp' is already defined in this scope
            emp.ManagementInfo();
            break;
        case 3:
            Student st = new Student();
            st.EducationInfo();
            break;
        default:
            MessageBox.Show("Not valid ...");
    }

why is emp recognized in 'case 2'? in C++ (if I am not wrong) we could use multiple cases together, but in C# that is impossible and we should close case 1 with break so the following code seems right in C++ and wrong in C#:

case 1:
case 2:
   SomeMethodUsedByBothStates();

When we can not have such behaviour so why should we be able to declare emp in case 1 and see it in case 2? If never two cases happen together so why should the object be seen in both?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Cases do not create scope in c++ or in c#. All of those variables declared inside a case are in the same scope, that of the switch statement. You need to use braces if you want those variables to be local to some specific case:

switch (personType)
{
    case 1: {
        Employee emp = new Employee();
        emp.ExperienceInfo();
        break;
    }
    case 2: {
        Employee emp = new Employee(); 
        // No longer an error; now 'emp' is local to this case.
        emp.ManagementInfo();
        break;
    }
    case 3: {
        Student st = new Student();
        st.EducationInfo();
        break;
    }
    ...
}
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+1. I learnt something new just now :) thanks –  Mahdi Tahsildari Dec 6 '12 at 4:47

The scope is not odd at all. The scope of a local variable is from the point where it's defined to the end of the block in which it's defined. So the various emp variables are each in scope until the end of the block that starts with the { after the switch statement and ends at the corresponding }. There's nothing special about case labels; they don't change the scope of variables.

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When you declare variables inside a case, use braces to spesification.

int personType = 1;
switch (personType)
{
    case 1: 
   {
     ///
     break;
   }
    case 2: 
   {
     ///
     break;
    }
    case 3: 
   {
        ///
        break;
   }
    ...
}
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The second code you showed is perfectly fine in C#, assuming case 2 had a break or return:

case 1:
    // no code here...
case 2:
    SomeMethodUsedByBothStates();
    break;

Empty cases are allowed to fall through.
What is not allowed is to have code in a case-branch that falls through. So, the following would be invalid:

case 1:
    SomeMethodUsedOnlyByCase1();
    // no break here...
case 2:
    SomeMethodUsedByBothStates();
    break;

The question about the scope is a different one. Basically, the scope is the switch statement itself, not a case-branch.

To make your example compile, simply give the case-branches scopes of their own by adding curly braces:

int personType = 1;
switch (personType)
{
    case 1:
    {
        Employee emp = new Employee();
        emp.ExperienceInfo();
        break;
    }
    case 2:
    {
        Employee emp = new Employee(); 
        emp.ManagementInfo();
        break;
    }
    case 3:
    {
        Student st = new Student();
        st.EducationInfo();
        break;
    }
    default:
        MessageBox.Show("Not valid ...");
}
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