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I know it's crappy design, I'm just kinda lazy to overhaul the code, I'd rather take a shortcut.

class Grandma
{
   public virtual void Mtd(){}
}

class Mommy : Grandma
{
   public override void Mtd(){ base.Mtd(); /* other stuff I wanna skip*/}
}

class Daughter : Mommy
{
   public override void Mtd(){ /*base.base.Mtd() //How can I do it ? */}
}

Because the method is virtual upcast won't work. So, is that even possible?

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possible duplicate of How to call base.base.method()? –  Sachin Shanbhag Dec 6 '12 at 11:51

2 Answers 2

It's not possible; however, if you want to take a shortcut, you could just add a type check within your Mommy method:

class Mommy : Grandma
{
    public override void Mtd()
    { 
        base.Mtd();   // calls `Grandma` implementation

        if (this.GetType() == typeof(Mommy))
        {
            // not executed for any derived class
        }

        if (!(this is Daughter))
        {
            // not executed for `Daughter`
        }
    }        
}

class Daughter : Mommy
{
    public override void Mtd()
    { 
        base.Mtd();   // calls `Mommy` implementation
    }
}
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1  
But that would make the Mommy class tightly coupled with the Daughter class, which I think is bad practice ;) –  Need4Steed Dec 5 '12 at 13:39
    
I've added an alternative check of this.GetType() == typeof(Mommy) that would exclude all derived classes, not just Daughter. Of course, this remains, as you requested, a "hack"; the proper solution would probably be to refactor your code (either by introducing a boolean parameter, or by splitting the method hierarchy). –  Douglas Dec 5 '12 at 13:50

It isn't possible to 'skip' the Mommy override. You'll have to refactor it somehow.

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