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Is it possible for Linux driver to have one kthread, interrupt handle & system call's. Means does linux Kernel kernel allows all of above three ?

Interrupt handler will save receive data from communication channel on interrupt.
Kthread will transmit data out of communication channel.
System call can be used to configure driver or get its status.

Also if Interrupt handler & kthread are using -- same hardware register -- then how can we protect this critical section ?

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Please, anyone who will like to comment ..!!!! –  Katoch Dec 6 '12 at 9:03
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Interrupt handler will save receive data from communication channel on interrupt.

A device driver's interrupt service routine, ISR, typically processes interrupts for receive conditions, transmit conditions, and error & status events. There have been devices that have multiple interrupt lines, but nowadays almost every device has only one interrupt line, and an interrupt status register has to be interrogated to determine the condition(s) that generated the interrupt(s).

To solely use the ISR for receiving would be unusual.

Kthread will transmit data out of communication channel.

A thread associated with a device driver is more likely to be a tasklet for "bottom-half processing". This is a technique to minimize the processing time in the ISR, yet perform some processing of the raw data, especially on received packets/frames.

Using a kthread to transmit data seems unorthodox, and can probably lead to problems (e.g. avoidable critical region). If the thread is performing polled programmed I/O because there is no DMA and no Tx interrupt available, then maybe such a scheme can be justified.

System call can be used to configure driver or get its status.

Linux device drivers already have a defined set of entry points: Linux device driver entry points
Most of these entry points are accessed indirectly by user apps through system calls.
It's unlikely that a syscall would be created specially for a driver.

Also if Interrupt handler & kthread are using -- same hardware register -- then how can we protect this critical section ?

Critical sections in the kernel are often protected with spin locks.
However exclusion locks will increase latencies and can reduce system responsiveness.
A good system design avoids creating (unnecessary) critical sections. If access to the device registers were parceled out to interrupt level and task level, perhaps just one spin lock sparely used would be necessary.

So one kthread, an interrupt handler and system calls can be associated with a Linux driver, but not necessarily how you specified.

Addendum

But in my case i am looking forward to use mmap system call to send & receive data from driver.

You will need to clarify what you mean by use mmap.
If you mean that you are going to mmap() a file that is on the target SPI device (e.g. an SD card or flash memory), then the filesystem or MTD layers will handle the "mapping", and the device driver will simply perform ordinary read & write operations.

When i receive data packet in interupt handler can i not directly send it to mapped region ? (your suggestion is-- Tasklet for bottom half can be good for received data)

If the target SPI device is a communication device receiving/transmitting packets, then your program probably cannot mmap() a buffer for that data. The mmap() capability is a clever re-purposing of the virtual memory capability. Instead of swapping text & data to/from the backing store (swap area), the virtual memory capabilities are used for a specific file appearing in user-space memory. Although all devices are represented as a "file", a device file will probably fail the stat() request during mmap(). Maybe it can be done (for limited transfers), but I've never tried it.

If you are referring to the fops mmap() function of the driver, then that is beyond me. In fact, only about 200 device driver out of more than 1200 drivers in the Linux source tree seem to implement that particular fops.

As per your suggestion I will use DMA to transmitt data out of the SPI port, to achieve this do we have to write some function for this & tell address of function to DMA ?

Are you implementing a driver for device that is connected by SPI or the SPI controller?
If it's a target device that uses SPI, then you will probably use one of these SPI drivers through the standard SPI interface. You'll probably use functions such as

spi_message_init()
spi_message_add_tail()
spi_sync()

to initiate and monitor the I/O operations. Use that cross-reference web site to search for those function names in other drivers for examples of usage. Use of DMA would be up to the SPI driver.
If you are implementing a driver for a SPI controller, then use those other SPI drivers as examples.

You seem to have a flattened view of I/O and driver concepts, but functionality in Linux is implemented in distinct layers.
You also seem intent on avoiding copying operations. There's a lot of buffering and copying of data in "computing". Often copying the data from one buffer to another buffer is simply the simplest solution to a tricky problem (e.g. protected versus unprotected memory).

Addendum 2

Perhaps you should review an existing high-performance MCP2515 CAN driver and the WCCD framework to replace SocketCAN. The authors document significant performance improvements by optimizing the ISR and minimizing the use of critical regions & their locks.

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I really appreciate your perfect reply. Just one more thing if you do not mind. ---------------- But in my case i am looking forward to use mmap system call to send & receive data from driver.---------------- When i receive data packet in interupt handler can i not directly send it to mapped region ? (your suggestion is-- Tasklet for bottom half can be good for received data) ---------- As per your suggestion I will use DMA to transmitt data out of the SPI port, to achieve this do we have to write some function for this & tell address of function to DMA ? –  Katoch Dec 6 '12 at 13:06
    
See Addendum for response. –  sawdust Dec 7 '12 at 2:43
    
thanks sawdust --- by mapping i mean to use mmap() for debugfs as in this example to tx data between driver & user process people.ee.ethz.ch/~arkeller/linux/… ---- Is it possible in SPI driver i associate driver memory to file in debugfs, and userspace process will map the device memory using mmap() call ? --- then we can easily tx data from user to driver --- even interupt handler can use this buffer to directly tx data to user space & we will not need bottom half to process the raw data --- what do you say ? –  Katoch Dec 7 '12 at 4:59
    
"Is it possible in SPI driver..." - A SPI driver is at too low a layer to perform that kind of mapping. Note that there is no /dev/spi; the SPI driver is a platform driver. "then we can easily tx data" - What kind of problems do you foresee with other schemes? What is this "device"? Is it a mass storage device or a comm device or ...? You don't seem to be making distinctions between the "device" and the SPI controller and their respective drivers. –  sawdust Dec 7 '12 at 10:49
    
Actually it is an CAN controller from microchip MCP2515. We can read received data from its internal buffer & tx data to it using SPI. It also generate active low interrupt on one pin once some data is received. ---- Now i want minimum copy from user space to driver space & use interrupt handler to receive data from the MCP2515. –  Katoch Dec 7 '12 at 12:17
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I see no reason why one driver won't have all these.

Your data should be protected with a lock. If a lock is ever taken from an interrupt handler, use spin_lock_irq/spin_unlock_irq to obtain and release it (in all places, not just the interrupt handler).

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