Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a C++ class "X" which would have special meaning if a container of them were to be sent to a std::ostream.

I originally implemented it specifically for std::vector<X>:

std::ostream& operator << ( std::ostream &os, const std::vector<X> &c )
{
   // The specialized logic here expects c to be a "container" in simple
   // terms - only that c.begin() and c.end() return input iterators to X
}

If I wanted to support std::ostream << std::deque<X> or std::ostream << std::set<X> or any similar container type, the only solution I know of is to copy-paste the entire function and change only the function signature!

Is there a way to generically code operator << ( std::ostream &, const Container & )?

("Container" here would be any type that satisfies the commented description above.)

share|improve this question
    
I would answer this with a template that just loops over the container printing each item in turn, however you wrote "The operation would be more complicated than just sending each X individually" which I think needs more explaination of what you actually want it to do? –  jcoder Dec 5 '12 at 13:56
    
Just overload operator<< for Container (is that really the type of the container class? Or is it more like Container<T>?). And there is no magic in C++ that will generate output for a container class if there is an output function for the items contained in the class. –  Zane Dec 5 '12 at 14:04
    
I would be interested in an answer to @J99 's first question. Can you show us the implementation of operator<< for the vector case? –  FredOverflow Dec 5 '12 at 18:13
1  
A very simple solution would be to use ostream << describe_range(your_container); and have describe_range return either a std::string or overload on operator<<(ostream&, range_description<Cont>) or something similar. –  Xeo Dec 5 '12 at 21:47
1  
There's actually a rather easy way of making the "overload on container of X" work, and I've basically finished it, but I'm still trying some things out and the explanation I saved in the answer draft vanished, so yeah... maybe sometime later tonight. –  Xeo Dec 5 '12 at 22:32
show 5 more comments

5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted
+50

If you have read this answer before, you might want to scroll down to the ADL version below. It is much improved.

First, a short and sweet version that pretty much works:

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>
template<typename T, typename Iterator, typename=void>
struct is_iterator_of_type: std::false_type {};

template<typename T, typename Iterator>
struct is_iterator_of_type<
  T,
  Iterator,
  typename std::enable_if<
    std::is_same<
      T,
      typename std::iterator_traits< Iterator >::value_type
    >::value
  >::type
>: std::true_type {};

template<typename Container>
auto operator<<( std::ostream& stream, Container const& c ) ->
  typename std::enable_if< is_iterator_of_type<int, typename Container::iterator>::value, std::ostream& >::type
{
  return stream << "int container\n";
}
template<typename Container>
auto operator<<( std::ostream& stream, Container const& c ) ->
  typename std::enable_if< is_iterator_of_type<double, typename Container::iterator>::value, std::ostream& >::type
{
  return stream << "double container\n";
}

which merely detects things that look sort of like int and double containers with distinct overloads. I would advise changing the implementation of operator<<. ;)

A more proper route (thanks @Xeo) would be this adl-hack. We create an auxiliary namespace where we import begin and end from std, then some template functions that do argument dependent lookup on begin and end (seeing the std version if we don't have a more tightly bound one), and then use these aux::adl_begin functions to determine if what we are passed in can be treated as a container over X:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <type_traits>
#include <iterator>
#include <set>

template<typename T, typename Iterator, typename=void>
struct is_iterator_of_type: std::false_type {};

template<typename T, typename Iterator>
struct is_iterator_of_type<
  T,
  Iterator,
  typename std::enable_if<
    std::is_same<
      T,
      typename std::iterator_traits< Iterator >::value_type
    >::value
  >::type
>: std::true_type {};

namespace aux {
  using std::begin;
  using std::end;
  template<class T>
  auto adl_begin(T&& v) -> decltype(begin(std::forward<T>(v))); // no implementation
  template<class T>
  auto adl_end(T&& v) -> decltype(end(std::forward<T>(v))); // no implementation
}

template<typename T, typename Container, typename=void>
struct is_container_of_type: std::false_type {};

template<typename T, typename Container>
struct is_container_of_type<
  T,
  Container,
  typename std::enable_if<
    // we only want this to be used if we iterable over doubles:
    is_iterator_of_type<
      T,
      decltype(void(aux::adl_begin(*(Container*)nullptr)), aux::adl_end(*(Container*)nullptr)) // ensure being and end work as bonus
    >::value
  >::type
>: std::true_type
{};

template<class Ch, class Tr, class Container>
auto operator<<( std::basic_ostream<Ch,Tr>& stream, Container const& c ) ->
  typename std::enable_if<
    is_container_of_type<double, Container>::value,
    decltype(stream)
  >::type
{
  stream << "'double' container: [ ";
  for(auto&& e:c)
    stream << e << " ";
  return stream << "]";
}

int main() {
  std::cout << std::vector<double>{1,2,3} << "\n";
  std::cout << std::set<double>{3.14,2.7,-10} << "\n";
  double array[] = {2.5, 3.14, 5.0};
  std::cout << array << "\n";
}

With this, not only do arrays of doubles count as containers over double, so does anything where in its namespace you define a begin and end function that returns iterators over double that takes the container as an argument also works. This matches how for(auto&& i:container) lookup works (perfectly? reasonably well?), so is a good working definition of "container".

Note, however, that as we add more of these embellishments, fewer current compilers have all of the C++11 features we are using. The above compiles in gcc 4.6 I believe, but not gcc 4.5.*.

...

And here is the original short code with some testing framework around it: (useful if your compiler throws it up, you can see where it goes wrong below)

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <set>

template<typename T, typename Iterator, typename=void>
struct is_iterator_of_type: std::false_type {};

template<typename T, typename Iterator>
struct is_iterator_of_type<
  T,
  Iterator,
  typename std::enable_if<
    std::is_same<
      T,
      typename std::iterator_traits< Iterator >::value_type
    >::value
  >::type
>: std::true_type {};

void test1() {
  std::cout << is_iterator_of_type<int, std::vector<int>::iterator>::value << "\n";
}
template<typename T, typename Container>
auto foo(Container const&) -> typename std::enable_if< is_iterator_of_type<T, typename Container::iterator>::value >::type
{
  std::cout << "Container of int\n";
}
template<typename T>
void foo(...)
{
  std::cout << "No match\n";
}
void test2() {
  std::vector<int> test;
  foo<int>(test);
  foo<int>(test.begin());
  foo<int>(std::set<int>());
}
template<typename Container>
auto operator<<( std::ostream& stream, Container const& c ) ->
  typename std::enable_if< is_iterator_of_type<int, typename Container::iterator>::value, std::ostream& >::type
{
  return stream << "int container\n";
}
void test3() {
  std::vector<int> test;
  std::cout << test;
  std::set<int> bar;
  std::cout << bar;
}
template<typename Container>
auto operator<<( std::ostream& stream, Container const& c ) ->
  typename std::enable_if< is_iterator_of_type<double, typename Container::iterator>::value, std::ostream& >::type
{
  return stream << "double container\n";
}
void test4() {
  std::vector<int> test;
  std::cout << test;
  std::set<int> bar;
  std::cout << bar;
  std::vector<double> dtest;
  std::cout << dtest;
}
void test5() {
  std::vector<bool> test;
  // does not compile (naturally):
  // std::cout << test;
}
template<typename Container>
auto operator<<( std::ostream& stream, Container const& c ) ->
  typename std::enable_if< is_iterator_of_type<bool, typename Container::iterator>::value, std::ostream& >::type
{
  return stream << "bool container\n";
}
void test6() {
  std::vector<bool> test;
  // now compiles:
  std::cout << test;
}
int main() {
  test1();
  test2();
  test3();
  test4();
  test5();
  test6();
}

about half of the above is testing boilerplate. The is_iterator_of_type template, and the operator<< overloads are what you want.

I am presuming that a container of type T is any class with a typedef iterator which whose value_type is a T. This will cover every std container, and most custom ones.

Link to execution run: http://ideone.com/lMUF4i -- note that some compilers don't support full C++11 SFINAE, and may require tomfoolery to get it to work.

Test cases left in to help someone check what level of support their compiler has for these techniques.

share|improve this answer
    
The streaming code is already written. I'm looking for a way to declare it for all container types. This solution doesn't work, but if you do have a "correct' method, I'm curious to see it. –  Drew Dormann Dec 10 '12 at 14:57
    
Just use sizeof(c.begin()==c.end()), which is shorter and additionally checks that the return types are comparable. Or in C++11 sizeof(std::begin(c)==std::end(c)) –  MSalters Dec 10 '12 at 15:09
    
@DrewDormann, the above code compiles and runs on ideone.com on a C++11 compiler. And generates [123]. And if you pass a class without a begin or end method, the operator<< will not match. Maybe your problem is that your compiler doesn't have enable_if yet? Writing that isn't hard either. @MSalters -- good thought, that does move it a step closer to being correct. –  Yakk Dec 10 '12 at 15:23
    
@DrewDormann or maybe you didn't spot the magic above. The above code is using SFINAE to make the operator<< only match if and only if the passed in type has a .begin() and .end() method. If it lacks such methods, the operator<< above will fail to match. I would like to know what you mean by "this solution doesn't work" -- doesn't work how? –  Yakk Dec 10 '12 at 15:28
1  
Oh, you want is_same, as in -> typename std::enable_if<std::is_same< typename Container::value_type, X >::value && sizeof(c.begin() == c.end()), std::ostream &>::type replacing that enable_if clause. The part that is incomplete is that full-on industrial "is this a container" detection is better than sizeof(c.begin() == c.end()), but in practice sizeof(c.begin() == c.end()) is pretty close to "is this a container" and I'm slack. Detecting "given that it is a container, is it a container of X" is trivial. –  Yakk Dec 10 '12 at 18:47
show 6 more comments
template<template<class T, class A> class container>
std::ostream& opertaor << ( std::ostream&, const container<X, std::allocator<X> > &)
{
}

This won't work if on your implementation vector, list, etc. have more than 2 template parameters.

share|improve this answer
2  
That works for vector, deque and list, but fails for everything else. –  Xeo Dec 5 '12 at 14:15
    
@Xeo: There's always some overloading that can be done :) –  Armen Tsirunyan Dec 5 '12 at 14:16
1  
The assumption is that any type with two template parameters X, std::allocator<X> would be a container for X? –  Drew Dormann Dec 5 '12 at 14:33
    
@DrewDormann: Yes. And only for exactly those parameters. –  Xeo Dec 5 '12 at 14:33
add comment

Simple if not elegant - and the next person to maintain your code might appreciate a lack of fancy templates! In practice I would hide the 'Print' method in a cpp, or at least a Detail namespace.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <deque>
#include <list>
#include <set>
#include <multiset>

class X {};

template <typename T>
std::ostream& Print(std::ostream& os, const T& container)
{
    for(auto ii = container.cbegin(); ii != container.cend(); ++ii);
        //etc
        //
    return os;
}

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const std::vector<X>& v) { return Print(os, v); }
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const std::deque<X>& v) { return Print(os, v); }
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const std::list<X>& v) { return Print(os, v); }
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const std::set<X>& v) { return Print(os, v); }
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const std::multiset<X>& v) { return Print(os, v); }

int main()
{
            // Example
    std::vector<X> v;
    std::cout << v;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That is both simple and elegant. Is there a way to apply this to containers that aren't in the C++03 library? Or even ones I don't yet know of? –  Drew Dormann Dec 10 '12 at 14:51
    
Just add more overloads. eg std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, MyContainerType<X>& v);. You'll know when you need to add an overload because you'll get a compiler error. Another nice thing is the overload can be located with the container - eg, say you deploy your code, and the Print function and your overloads are 'locked down'. If someone creates/uses a new container they can just define the operator<< overload with the container - it can use the Print function - so they don't need to edit your code to use a new container type. –  Zero Dec 10 '12 at 15:03
    
I think those are fairly solid solutions, though they don't answer this question. I agree that if I gave up on making it work for arbitrary containers of X or if I gave up on implementing "operator <<" this would be a good answer. –  Drew Dormann Dec 10 '12 at 19:49
add comment

If you slightly redefine the question to providing special streaming behavior for any class that provides range based access to Widget, instead of special behavior for all Widget containers, one solution is:

  template <class Container>
  std::ostream& operator << (std::ostream &out, const Container &container) 
  {
    for(const Widget& c : container) {
      out << c;
      out.put(' ');
    }
    return out;
  }

This works for std::vector, std::list, std::deque, and std::set. If you attempt to stream something that does not provide range access to Widget, say std::list<int>, you'll get a compilation error, because the const Widget reference cannot bind to the ints in std::list<int>. If you provide an overload for operator << for std::list<int> the code will compile.

share|improve this answer
    
Replace Container with const Container& in the signature and this looks like the obvious solution... –  Zero Dec 10 '12 at 14:21
1  
That sounds like a reasonable redefinition of the question. I think it would cause more errors than you mention though, since that function would be considered when inserting absolutely anything to an ostream. You couldn't have two of them in a project, for example. –  Drew Dormann Dec 10 '12 at 14:49
    
The const & is a good idea, and I edited the code to match. Drew is right that you couldn't have more than two of them in a project. –  razeh Dec 10 '12 at 21:55
add comment

While @razeh has a nice solution, if you need to get fancy and have specialized printing for a container of X versus a container of Y, you can do the following:

    // Types for which you want specialized streaming of containers
    // We need some identifiable typedef in these types
    struct  X { typedef void X_type; };
    struct  Y { typedef void Y_type; };


    // Wrappers for implementing streaming logic for each type        

template <typename C>
struct WrapX
{
    WrapX(const C& c) : c(c) { }
    const C& c;

    std::ostream& stream(std::ostream& os)
    {
         // Special container of X printing
         return os;
    }
};

template <typename C>
struct WrapY
{
    WrapY(const C& c) : c(c) { }
    const C& c;

    std::ostream& stream(std::ostream& os)
    {
        // Special container of Y printing
        return os;
    }
};

    // Wrap functions, by using a 'dummy' parameter
    // we can get the compiler to select the function based
    // on the incoming type

template <typename C >
WrapX<C> Wrap(const C& c,  typename C::value_type::X_type* = 0) { return WrapX<C>(c); }

template <typename C>
WrapY<C> Wrap(const C& c, typename C::value_type::Y_type* = 0) { return WrapY<C>(c); }



    // Overload - same problem as @razeh solution, this is a VERY generic
    // function and may clash with other declarations. Keep it closely confined to
    // where you need it.
template <typename C>
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const C& c) { return Wrap(c).stream(os);  }




int main()
{
    std::vector<X> vx;
    std::cout << vx;

        std::vector<Y> vy;
        std::cout << vy;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.