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I have a list of objects in this format :

class myObj {

    private String identifier;

    public myObj(String identifier){
        this.identifier = identifier;
    }

}

List<myObj> allobjects = new ArrayList<myObj>();
allobjects.add(new myObj("123"));
allobjects.add(new myObj("123"));
allobjects.add(new myObj("123"));
allobjects.add(new myObj("123"));
allobjects.add(new myObj("1234"));
allobjects.add(new myObj("12345"));
allobjects.add(new myObj("12"));
allobjects.add(new myObj("12"));

What is an elegant method of extracting the duplicate objects into seperate Lists ? So in above example a new List is returned containing two lists. The first lists contains :

new myObj("123");
new myObj("123");
new myObj("123");
new myObj("123"); 

The second list contains :

new myObj("12");
new myObj("12");

A possible solution is to create a new object :

List<List<myObj>> newList = new ArrayList<List<myObj>>

And then for each element in the list 'allobjects' iterate over each element and for each element that is contained more than once add it to the list. Then at the end of the iteration for the current element add the newly created list to 'newList'

Is this acceptable or is there another solution ?

share|improve this question
    
Would a solution where unique elements also got their own lists be okay? – durron597 Dec 5 '12 at 14:03
    
@durron597 I geuss, I could just ignore List items of size == 1 – blue-sky Dec 5 '12 at 14:04
1  
Sort your list using a custom Comparator<myObj> (or create new list and sort that one). Go through the sorted list and detect neighbouring duplicates. This way your algorithm would only be O(nlogn) while your proposed solution is O(n²). – brimborium Dec 5 '12 at 14:25
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Add equals and hashCode methods to the myObj class, so that you can use them as Map keys:

class myObj {

    private String identifier;

    public myObj(String identifier){
        this.identifier = identifier;
    }

    public int hashCode(){
        return identifier.hashCode();
    }

    public boolean equals(Object o){
        return identifier.equals(((myObj)o).identifier);
    }
}

Then declare a Map:

Map<myObj, List<myObj>> map = new HashMap<myObj, List<MyObj>>()

and iterate through the original list. Use the myObjs as a map key, retrieving each time a list that corresponds to that myObj. If you encounter a certain myObj for the first time, don't forget to create the list:

for(myObj obj : allobjects){
    List<myObj> list = map.get(obj);
    if(list == null){
        list = new ArrayList<myObj>();
        map.put(obj, list);
    }
    list.add(obj);
}
share|improve this answer

Implement equals as required and then you can just use contains and iterate through checking other collection.

Here's a way to do it with jdk8s' lambdas.

TransformService transformService = (inputs1, inputs2) -> {
            Collection<String> results = new ArrayList<>();
            for (String str : inputs1) {
                if (inputs2.contains(str)) {
                    results.add(str);
                }
            }
            return results;
        };
        Collection<String> inputs1 = new ArrayList<String>(2) {{
            add("lemon");
            add("cheese");
            add("orange");
        }};
        Collection<String> inputs2 = new
                ArrayList<String>(2) {{
                    add("apple");
                    add("random");
                    add("cheese");
                }};
        Collection<String> results = transformService.transform(inputs1, inputs2);
        for (String result : results) {
            System.out.println(result);
        }
    }

    public interface TransformService {
        Collection<String> transform(Collection<String> inputs1, Collection<String> inputs2);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I should have mentioned this needs to work with java6 so no lambdas :( – blue-sky Dec 5 '12 at 14:05
    
@user470184 well the answer is still there, just loop through list, and if contains, add to new list .... – NimChimpsky Dec 5 '12 at 14:06

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