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with multiprocessing python library I can launch multiprocess, like

import multiprocessing as mu

def worker(n)
        print "worker:", n
        n = int(1e4)
        for i in range(n):
                for j in range(n):
                        i*j 
        return

if __name__ == '__main__':
        jobs = []
        for i in range(5):
                p = mu.Process(target=worker, args=(i,))
                jobs.append(p)
                p.start()

and I can get the numbers of processors (cpu cores) with

np = mu.cpu_count()

but if I have a list of process, how I can launch without overcharge the processor ?
if I have a quad core, how I can launch first 4 process? and when finish a process launch other.

References

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2 Answers 2

I would suggest side stepping the problem and using multiprocessing.Pool (example, api).

(modified from the example in the docs)

from multiprocessing import Pool

def f(x):
    return x*x

if __name__ == '__main__':
    num_proc = multiprocessing.cpu_count()
    pool = Pool(processes=num_proc)
    res = pool.map(f, range(10))

Alternately, you can set up a producer/consumer scheme and have a fixed number of long running sub-processes.

A third really quick and dirty way is using one mu.Queue. Note that get blocks until it gets a result back.

import multiprocessing as mu
import time
res = mu.Queue()

def worker(n):
    print "worker:", n
    time.sleep(1)
    res.put(n)
    return

if __name__ == '__main__':
    jobs = []
    np = mu.cpu_count()
    print np
    # start first round
    for j in range(np):
        p = mu.Process(target=worker, args=(j,))
        jobs.append(p)
        p.start()
    # every time one finishes, start the next one
    for i in range(np,15):
        r = res.get()
        print 'res', r
        p = mu.Process(target=worker, args=(i,))
        jobs.append(p)
        p.start()
    # get the remaining processes 
    for j in range(np):
        r = res.get()
        print 'res', r
share|improve this answer
    
I know the pool.map but my question is more with, how management sets of process? maybe with .is_alive() –  JuanPablo Dec 5 '12 at 15:11
    
The docs say this about the processes keyword: "If processes is None then the number returned by cpu_count() is used" so what you're suggesting with num_proc is what happens by default. –  martineau Dec 5 '12 at 15:32
    
@martineau fair enough, but it never hurts to make things explicit (I have been bitten by different default behavior between systems/versions (mostly of matplotlib styling)) –  tcaswell Dec 5 '12 at 15:59
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I make this solution

import multiprocessing as mu

def worker(n):
        print "worker:", n
        n = int(1e4/2)
        for i in range(n):
                for j in range(n):
                        i*j
        return

if __name__ == '__main__':
        jobs = []
        for i in range(5):
                p = mu.Process(target=worker, args=(i,))
                jobs.append(p)

        running = []
        np = mu.cpu_count()

        for i in range(np):
                p = jobs.pop()
                running.append(p)
                p.start()

        while jobs != []:
                for r in running:
                        if r.exitcode == 0:
                                running.remove(r)
                                p = jobs.pop()
                                p.start()
                                running.append(p)
share|improve this answer
    
I think you are going to kill the the last np processes before they are done. The main process will finish after you empty jobs and will not wait for the sub-processes to finish. –  tcaswell Dec 5 '12 at 15:57

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