Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Very short qustion. Lets say user1 and user2 are connected to the router.

User1 opens mozilla firefox on, lets say, port 12000. User2 opens mozilla firefox on port 12001.

Lets say both users load up page www.google.com

When router will send packets to the google, what kind of an adress google will see from user1 and user2? Will it be something like 123.123.123.123:7777 for both users OR will it be something like 123.123.123.123:12000 for user1 and 123.123.123.123:12001 for user2?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

User1 opens mozilla firefox on, lets say, port 12000.

This isn't how it works.

Any client connecting to any server will get an ephemeral port assigned by its OS. So the connection goes from 192.168.0.5:12000 (12000 being the ephemeral port, i.e. random) to 123.123.123.123:7777.

The second client, connecting from a different IP, will use the combination 192.168.0.6:12001 (or really, any other port, it can even also be 12000) to 123.123.123.123:7777.

The router saves these combinations of IP's and ports to perform NAT. While performing NAT, the router will use the external address and probably even a different ephemeral (source) port to connect to the destination.

share|improve this answer
    
"Any client connecting to any server will get an ephemeral port assigned by its OS" ... UNLESS the client explicitally binds to a specific port before connecting, which is perfectly valid to do, especially if a firewall restricts the availble ports, or the protocol being used requires specific ports. –  Remy Lebeau Dec 5 '12 at 17:10
1  
So, to answer the actual question: "what kind of an adress google will see from user1 and user2?", the answer is: "<RouterExternalIP>:<RouterPortUsedForUser1> and <RouterExternalIP>:<RouterPortUsedForUser2>" –  Remy Lebeau Dec 5 '12 at 17:13
    
@Remy you're correct, I was talking about the general case. –  CodeCaster Dec 5 '12 at 17:27
    
It's also not safe to assume NAT is being used. There are still computers that connect without NAT. If there is no NAT'ing taking place the router will not cache any port/ip mappings. His example suggests NAT but it's important for him to know that NAT is not always in play. –  WildBill Dec 7 '12 at 0:13
    
@WildBill valid observation, thanks. But that is also an edge case. I'll not going to spell out all of TCP/IP and all surrounding protocols for a question like this. –  CodeCaster Dec 7 '12 at 7:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.