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I need a functor which does a very simple thing, basically this:

template<typename T>
struct Extract
{
    T & operator()(T *t)
    {
        return *t;
    }
};

I don't want to replicate code, and I believe that such a simple and handy piece of code should already exist somewhere. I've tried looking for it, but with no success.

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why not simply use '*', instead of Extract? –  BЈовић Dec 5 '12 at 15:18
3  
Can you show some use cases for this ? –  Sander De Dycker Dec 5 '12 at 15:20
    
I think the use case is same as for std::plus and similar functors. –  Juraj Blaho Dec 5 '12 at 15:22
    
@Juraj: could you enlighten us with one or two sentences? –  Zane Dec 5 '12 at 15:29
3  
@Zane: transform(input.begin(), input.end(), output.begin(), Extract()); –  Juraj Blaho Dec 5 '12 at 15:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I suppose you want to iterate over some container and do smth with pointers in it? Or even build a higher order function based on existed (like std::plus & etc)...

for that purpose boost library have few solutions:

both are capable to work not only w/ raw pointers but include support for some smart one...

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That's it, thanks! –  tymbark Dec 10 '12 at 10:22

First, there is a syntax error in your example, I think you are trying to overload the function call operator as such:

template<typename T>
struct Extract
{
    T& operator()(T *t)
    {
        return *t;
    }
};

Next, it seems that this is converting a pointer to a reference. You can do this using std::ref and std::cref in the standard library. They create a std::reference_wrapper from a value so you would deference the pointer argument before sending it to std::ref.

How yours is used:

Extract<int> ex;
int n = 1;
int* n_ptr = &n;
int& n2 = ex(n_ptr);

How std::ref would be used:

int n = 1;
int* n_ptr = &n;
int& n2 = std::ref(*n_ptr);
share|improve this answer
    
std::ref is not what OP wants. He wants a functor which returns a referece given a pointer. –  user1773602 Dec 5 '12 at 15:39
    
@aleguna Isn't a function a kind of functor? –  Bret Kuhns Dec 5 '12 at 15:40
    
@BretKuhns, it is, but std::ref doesn't do what OP wants –  user1773602 Dec 5 '12 at 15:42

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