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Background

Using boost and other similar libraries is the easiest way to find compiler shortcomings, but is there a stage at which things go too far?

This mangled symbol:

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(1,388 characters)

Translates into (thanks c++filt!):

boost::spirit::qi::detail::parser_binder<boost::spirit::qi::alternative<boost::fusion::cons<boost::spirit::qi::sequence<boost::fusion::cons<boost::spirit::qi::lexeme_directive<boost::spirit::qi::sequence<boost::fusion::cons<boost::spirit::qi::action<boost::spirit::qi::reference<boost::spirit::qi::rule<__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<char const*, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > >, xxxxxxx::ir::carry_op::Op ()(), boost::fusion::unused_type, boost::fusion::unused_type> const>, boost::phoenix::actor<boost::phoenix::composite<boost::phoenix::assign_eval, boost::fusion::vector<boost::spirit::local_variable<0>, boost::spirit::argument<0>, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_> > > >, boost::fusion::cons<boost::spirit::qi::char_class<boost::spirit::tag::char_code<boost::spirit::tag::space, boost::spirit::char_encoding::ascii> >, boost::fusion::nil> > > >, boost::fusion::cons<boost::spirit::qi::action<boost::spirit::qi::sequence<boost::fusion::cons<boost::spirit::qi::reference<boost::spirit::qi::rule<__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<char const*, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > >, std::basic_string<wchar_t, std::char_traits<wchar_t>, std::allocator<wchar_t> > ()(), xxxxxxx::parser::white_space<__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<char const*, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > > >, boost::fusion::unused_type> const>, boost::fusion::cons<boost::spirit::qi::literal_char<boost::spirit::char_encoding::standard, true, false>, boost::fusion::cons<boost::spirit::qi::reference<boost::spirit::qi::rule<__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<char const*, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > >, std::basic_string<wchar_t, std::char_traits<wchar_t>, std::allocator<wchar_t> > ()(), 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std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > >, std::basic_string<wchar_t, std::char_traits<wchar_t>, std::allocator<wchar_t> > ()(), xxxxxxx::parser::white_space<__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<char const*, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > > >, boost::fusion::unused_type> const>, boost::fusion::cons<boost::spirit::qi::literal_char<boost::spirit::char_encoding::standard, true, false>, boost::fusion::cons<boost::spirit::qi::reference<boost::spirit::qi::rule<__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<char const*, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > >, std::basic_string<wchar_t, std::char_traits<wchar_t>, std::allocator<wchar_t> > ()(), xxxxxxx::parser::white_space<__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<char const*, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > > >, boost::fusion::unused_type> const>, boost::fusion::nil> > > > > > > > > >, boost::phoenix::actor<boost::phoenix::composite<boost::phoenix::assign_eval, boost::fusion::vector<boost::spirit::attribute<0>, boost::phoenix::composite<boost::phoenix::detail::construct_eval<xxxxxxx::ir::carry_op>, boost::fusion::vector<boost::spirit::local_variable<0>, boost::spirit::argument<0>, boost::spirit::argument<1>, boost::spirit::argument<2>, boost::spirit::argument<3>, boost::spirit::argument<4>, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_> >, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_> > > >, boost::fusion::nil> > >, boost::fusion::cons<boost::spirit::qi::sequence<boost::fusion::cons<boost::spirit::qi::lexeme_directive<boost::spirit::qi::sequence<boost::fusion::cons<boost::spirit::qi::action<boost::spirit::qi::reference<boost::spirit::qi::rule<__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<char const*, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > >, 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xxxxxxx::parser::white_space<__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<char const*, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > > >, boost::fusion::unused_type> const>, boost::fusion::cons<boost::spirit::qi::literal_char<boost::spirit::char_encoding::standard, true, false>, boost::fusion::cons<boost::spirit::qi::reference<boost::spirit::qi::rule<__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<char const*, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > >, std::basic_string<wchar_t, std::char_traits<wchar_t>, std::allocator<wchar_t> > ()(), xxxxxxx::parser::white_space<__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<char const*, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > > >, boost::fusion::unused_type> const>, boost::fusion::cons<boost::spirit::qi::literal_char<boost::spirit::char_encoding::standard, true, false>, boost::fusion::cons<boost::spirit::qi::reference<boost::spirit::qi::rule<__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<char const*, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > >, std::basic_string<wchar_t, std::char_traits<wchar_t>, std::allocator<wchar_t> > ()(), xxxxxxx::parser::white_space<__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<char const*, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > > >, boost::fusion::unused_type> const>, boost::fusion::cons<boost::spirit::qi::literal_char<boost::spirit::char_encoding::standard, true, false>, boost::fusion::cons<boost::spirit::qi::literal_char<boost::spirit::char_encoding::standard, true, false>, boost::fusion::cons<boost::spirit::qi::literal_char<boost::spirit::char_encoding::standard, true, false>, boost::fusion::cons<boost::spirit::qi::reference<boost::spirit::qi::rule<__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<char const*, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > >, std::basic_string<wchar_t, std::char_traits<wchar_t>, std::allocator<wchar_t> > ()(), xxxxxxx::parser::white_space<__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<char const*, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > > >, boost::fusion::unused_type> const>, boost::fusion::nil> > > > > > > > > >, boost::phoenix::actor<boost::phoenix::composite<boost::phoenix::assign_eval, boost::fusion::vector<boost::spirit::attribute<0>, boost::phoenix::composite<boost::phoenix::detail::construct_eval<xxxxxxx::ir::carry_op>, boost::fusion::vector<boost::spirit::local_variable<0>, boost::spirit::argument<0>, boost::spirit::argument<1>, boost::spirit::argument<2>, boost::phoenix::value<boost::optional<std::basic_string<wchar_t, std::char_traits<wchar_t>, std::allocator<wchar_t> > > >, boost::spirit::argument<3>, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_> >, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_> > > >, boost::fusion::nil> > >, boost::fusion::cons<boost::spirit::qi::sequence<boost::fusion::cons<boost::spirit::qi::lexeme_directive<boost::spirit::qi::sequence<boost::fusion::cons<boost::spirit::qi::action<boost::spirit::qi::reference<boost::spirit::qi::rule<__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<char const*, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > >, xxxxxxx::ir::carry_op::Op ()(), boost::fusion::unused_type, boost::fusion::unused_type> const>, boost::phoenix::actor<boost::phoenix::composite<boost::phoenix::assign_eval, boost::fusion::vector<boost::spirit::local_variable<0>, boost::spirit::argument<0>, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_> > > >, boost::fusion::cons<boost::spirit::qi::char_class<boost::spirit::tag::char_code<boost::spirit::tag::space, boost::spirit::char_encoding::ascii> >, boost::fusion::nil> > > >, boost::fusion::cons<boost::spirit::qi::action<boost::spirit::qi::sequence<boost::fusion::cons<boost::spirit::qi::reference<boost::spirit::qi::rule<__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<char const*, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > >, std::basic_string<wchar_t, std::char_traits<wchar_t>, std::allocator<wchar_t> > ()(), xxxxxxx::parser::white_space<__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<char const*, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > > >, boost::fusion::unused_type> const>, boost::fusion::cons<boost::spirit::qi::literal_char<boost::spirit::char_encoding::standard, true, false>, boost::fusion::cons<boost::spirit::qi::reference<boost::spirit::qi::rule<__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<char const*, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > >, std::basic_string<wchar_t, std::char_traits<wchar_t>, std::allocator<wchar_t> > ()(), xxxxxxx::parser::white_space<__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<char const*, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > > >, boost::fusion::unused_type> const>, boost::fusion::cons<boost::spirit::qi::literal_char<boost::spirit::char_encoding::standard, true, false>, boost::fusion::cons<boost::spirit::qi::reference<boost::spirit::qi::rule<__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<char const*, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > >, std::basic_string<wchar_t, std::char_traits<wchar_t>, std::allocator<wchar_t> > ()(), xxxxxxx::parser::white_space<__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<char const*, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > > >, boost::fusion::unused_type> const>, boost::fusion::cons<boost::spirit::qi::literal_char<boost::spirit::char_encoding::standard, true, false>, boost::fusion::cons<boost::spirit::qi::reference<boost::spirit::qi::rule<__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<char const*, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > >, std::basic_string<wchar_t, std::char_traits<wchar_t>, std::allocator<wchar_t> > ()(), xxxxxxx::parser::white_space<__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<char const*, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > > >, boost::fusion::unused_type> const>, boost::fusion::nil> > > > > > > >, boost::phoenix::actor<boost::phoenix::composite<boost::phoenix::assign_eval, boost::fusion::vector<boost::spirit::attribute<0>, boost::phoenix::composite<boost::phoenix::detail::construct_eval<xxxxxxx::ir::carry_op>, boost::fusion::vector<boost::spirit::local_variable<0>, boost::spirit::argument<0>, boost::spirit::argument<1>, boost::spirit::argument<2>, boost::spirit::argument<3>, boost::phoenix::value<boost::optional<std::basic_string<wchar_t, std::char_traits<wchar_t>, std::allocator<wchar_t> > > >, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_> >, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_, boost::fusion::void_> > > >, boost::fusion::nil> > >, boost::fusion::nil> > > >, mpl_::bool_<false> >

(12,980 characters)


Question

So my question is, in light of these (which technically don't pass the standard as I understand it, as the mangled name is over 1,024 characters), is this a sign that C++ is showing its age by not keeping up-to-date with the newest concepts? Or is it simply a sign that programmers are expecting too much from the language, and template libraries like boost are doing the best they can to facilitate this?

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4  
I would really like to know what that thing is supposed to be doing. –  Michael Foukarakis Sep 3 '09 at 10:53
2  
That thing is an object from boost::spirit, which is a way to write a parser in C++. It uses (abuses?) operator overloading and templates to approximate the ability to write directly in EBNF syntax, which is why you end up with such ridiculous types (although of course you never write that kind of stuff out directly). –  Tyler McHenry Sep 3 '09 at 12:14
8  
Then I don't see the point of this post. It's the same as saying - hey, is assembly showing its age as programmers use higher-level constructs? –  Michael Foukarakis Sep 3 '09 at 12:23
1  
I think the mangled name length limit is a red herring. C89 (and C++ as well? Can't remember without checking) has quite a low limit on how many nested braces a compiler is required to support in source. But it's not a serious constraint on the language, it's just convenient for compiler-writers for the concept to be out there that there could be a limit before the compiling machine runs out of resources. It's convenient for users for that limit to be as large as possible. If it's not large enough for practical purposes, then compiler writers can respond. –  Steve Jessop Sep 3 '09 at 13:14
2  
Isn't the 1024-character limit just a minimum though? As in implementations must support at least that length? Most of the magic constants in C and C++ are defined that way. Minimum supported template instantiation depth, minimum supported nested scopes and so on. There are plenty such limitations, but implementations are free to support higher limits. –  jalf Sep 3 '09 at 13:36
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9 Answers

up vote 47 down vote accepted

Wouldn't the language be showing its age if people did not apply it to new, bigger problems than originally intended?

I think this is exactly the opposite -- it shows that C++ is able to do something far more complex than was intended in the earliest versions of the language. How is that "showing its age"? C++ would be showing its age if it was still being used in the half-baked Java-like OOP style popular 15 years ago.

I think the fact that the usage of the language continues to evolve so much, even when the actual standard is unchanged, is a sign of strength.

Of course, C++ is showing its age in countless other ways, but I don't think this is one of them. On the contrary, this is one of C++'s redeeming features.

share|improve this answer
    
Seconded. –  j_random_hacker Sep 3 '09 at 11:53
    
I honestly didn't consider that perspective, and I agree. +1. –  Matthew Iselin Sep 3 '09 at 12:03
3  
Can I please have a dozen votes to pile it on this answer? –  sbi Sep 3 '09 at 12:49
1  
@jalf: So wait, you're saying that ridiculously long symbols is a "redeeming feature"? :P –  Dan Moulding Oct 30 '09 at 2:06
1  
@Dan: no, I don't think so. Where did you see me saying that? –  jalf Jun 17 '11 at 21:00
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In C++, the mangled symbol name is the equivalent of the call stack in other languages.

Show a 1970s asm programmer a call stack 23 deep, and they would say 'surely that is taking that new-fangled function stuff a bit far? How could you possibly debug and analyse something that complicated? You would need a special tool just to work out where everything was in memory'.

In fact, in the absence of a debugger, it would actually be really impractical to work with functions nested that deep - fine when things work, but when they break, it becomes impossibly complex to relate the memory image back to your code.

Eclipse CDT actually has a really nice feature where it can take pre-processor macros and expand them one step at a time, with backwards and forwards buttons. Display of templates, especially in error messages, needs something like that. So you can navigate between

list<T>
list<ptr<t>>
list<ptr<string<T>>>>

and so on.

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1  
Agreed. Mangled names and names of complex template instantiations have nothing to do with using C++; they are internal implementation details. It's unfortunate that there is a 1,024-character limit, but it doesn't reflect anything about C++'s usefulness. –  Kristopher Johnson Sep 3 '09 at 11:02
    
@Kristopher Johnson: Surely level of complexity is beyond what the language was originally designed to cater for, though? The fact it works notwithstanding, of course. –  Matthew Iselin Sep 3 '09 at 11:08
    
It's certainly going beyond what the implementation and tooling of the language was designed for. The asm programmer above wouldn't be wrong if, given a core dump from a crash, they had to manually work out how the compiler had 'location mangled' all his variables onto the stack. –  soru Sep 3 '09 at 11:23
    
Dunno about call stack, but certainly a hierarchy of templated types to give a single type signature... –  Dan Sep 3 '09 at 11:43
3  
@Matthew: First you have to define what "the language as originally designed" actually is. "C with classes"? Pre-standard C++? C++98? –  sbi Sep 3 '09 at 12:48
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I think the fact that people keep coming up with new ways of using the features of C++ is the sign of its flexibility and power, not its aging.

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As much as a wrench shows its age when it's being used to hammer in a nail.

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1  
Nah, I agree with jalf. It's more like a wrench "showing its age" when it's being used to tighten a nut on the Millennium Falcon. Nothing wrong with the wrench, and nothing wrong with using it for that purpose, just because its inventor didn't explicitly intend it to be used for interstellar travel. –  Steve Jessop Sep 3 '09 at 13:19
2  
As The Tao Of Programming so elegantly puts it: "The Tao gave birth to machine language. Machine language gave birth to the assembler. The assembler gave birth to the compiler. Now there are ten thousand languages. Each language has its purpose, however humble. Each language expresses the Yin and Yang of software. Each language has its place within the Tao. But do not program in COBOL if you can avoid it." –  Grant Peters Sep 3 '09 at 13:26
    
I wrench will tighten a bolt no matter what, and it's still a good tool for it. You can also use it to hammer in a nail, but it's not the right tool for the job. –  databyss Sep 5 '09 at 2:53
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I think it's a sign of aging for the standard limiting mangled name to 1,024 characters ;-)

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Most of the resulting name is "noise", in that it's either specified by a typedef, or the arguments were defaults.

This IMHO, is more of an issue with where compiler implementors have decided to focus their efforts. Most compiler vendors spend more of their time ensuring that they implement the (complex) C++ standard correctly in a way that produces code that is as fast as they can possibly make it.

Providing pretty names for most is an after thought to the above.

Just to highlight this, with the exception of the last two items, the following mappings could be implemented in the demangler so that they always took place:

  • We can search and replace basic_string<const char *, ...> and replace it with string
  • We can search and replace basic_string<const wchar_t *, ...> and replace it with wstring
  • We can search and replace __gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<char const *... and replace it with string::const_iterator
  • For display purposes we can remove boost::<namespace>:: and std:: as in context these don't add much.
  • Finally, C++ 0x will introduce template parameter packs and so we can remove things like boost:fusion::void_, boost:fusion::void_, boost:fusion::void_, since there will no longer be any need for preprocessor hacks to handle them.

After all of the above we have:

qi::detail::parser_binder<qi::alternative<cons<qi::sequence<cons<qi::lexeme_directive<qi::sequence<cons<qi::action<qi::reference<qi::rule<string::const_iterator, xxxxxxx::ir::carry_op::Op ()(), unused_type, unused_type> const>, boost::phoenix::actor<boost::phoenix::composite<boost::phoenix::assign_eval, vector<local_variable<0>, argument<0> > > > >, cons<qi::char_class<tag::char_code<tag::space, char_encoding::ascii> > > > > >, cons<qi::action<qi::sequence<cons<qi::reference<qi::rule<string::const_iterator, wstring()(), xxxxxxx::parser::white_space<string::const_iterator >, unused_type> const>, cons<qi::literal_char<char_encoding::standard, true, false>, cons<qi::reference<qi::rule<string::const_iterator, wstring()(), xxxxxxx::parser::white_space<string::const_iterator >, unused_type> const>, cons<qi::literal_char<char_encoding::standard, true, false>, cons<qi::reference<qi::rule<string::const_iterator, wstring()(), xxxxxxx::parser::white_space<string::const_iterator >, unused_type> const>, cons<qi::literal_char<char_encoding::standard, true, false>, cons<qi::reference<qi::rule<string::const_iterator, wstring()(), xxxxxxx::parser::white_space<string::const_iterator >, unused_type> const>, cons<qi::literal_char<char_encoding::standard, true, false>, cons<qi::reference<qi::rule<string::const_iterator, wstring()(), xxxxxxx::parser::white_space<string::const_iterator >, unused_type> const> > > > > > > > > > >, boost::phoenix::actor<boost::phoenix::composite<boost::phoenix::assign_eval, vector<attribute<0>, boost::phoenix::composite<boost::phoenix::detail::construct_eval<xxxxxxx::ir::carry_op>, vector<local_variable<0>, argument<0>, argument<1>, argument<2>, argument<3>, argument<4> > > > > > > > > >, cons<qi::sequence<cons<qi::lexeme_directive<qi::sequence<cons<qi::action<qi::reference<qi::rule<string::const_iterator, xxxxxxx::ir::carry_op::Op ()(), unused_type, unused_type> const>, boost::phoenix::actor<boost::phoenix::composite<boost::phoenix::assign_eval, vector<local_variable<0>, argument<0> > > > >, cons<qi::char_class<tag::char_code<tag::space, char_encoding::ascii> > > > > >, cons<qi::action<qi::sequence<cons<qi::reference<qi::rule<string::const_iterator, wstring()(), xxxxxxx::parser::white_space<string::const_iterator >, unused_type> const>, cons<qi::literal_char<char_encoding::standard, true, false>, cons<qi::reference<qi::rule<string::const_iterator, wstring()(), xxxxxxx::parser::white_space<string::const_iterator >, unused_type> const>, cons<qi::literal_char<char_encoding::standard, true, false>, cons<qi::reference<qi::rule<string::const_iterator, wstring()(), xxxxxxx::parser::white_space<string::const_iterator >, unused_type> const>, cons<qi::literal_char<char_encoding::standard, true, false>, cons<qi::literal_char<char_encoding::standard, true, false>, cons<qi::literal_char<char_encoding::standard, true, false>, cons<qi::reference<qi::rule<string::const_iterator, wstring()(), xxxxxxx::parser::white_space<string::const_iterator >, unused_type> const> > > > > > > > > > >, boost::phoenix::actor<boost::phoenix::composite<boost::phoenix::assign_eval, vector<attribute<0>, boost::phoenix::composite<boost::phoenix::detail::construct_eval<xxxxxxx::ir::carry_op>, vector<local_variable<0>, argument<0>, argument<1>, argument<2>, boost::phoenix::value<boost::optional<wstring> >, argument<3> > > > > > > > > >, cons<qi::sequence<cons<qi::lexeme_directive<qi::sequence<cons<qi::action<qi::reference<qi::rule<string::const_iterator, xxxxxxx::ir::carry_op::Op ()(), unused_type, unused_type> const>, boost::phoenix::actor<boost::phoenix::composite<boost::phoenix::assign_eval, vector<local_variable<0>, argument<0> > > > >, cons<qi::char_class<tag::char_code<tag::space, char_encoding::ascii> > > > > >, cons<qi::action<qi::sequence<cons<qi::reference<qi::rule<string::const_iterator, wstring()(), xxxxxxx::parser::white_space<string::const_iterator >, unused_type> const>, cons<qi::literal_char<char_encoding::standard, true, false>, cons<qi::reference<qi::rule<string::const_iterator, wstring()(), xxxxxxx::parser::white_space<string::const_iterator >, unused_type> const>, cons<qi::literal_char<char_encoding::standard, true, false>, cons<qi::reference<qi::rule<string::const_iterator, wstring()(), xxxxxxx::parser::white_space<string::const_iterator >, unused_type> const>, cons<qi::literal_char<char_encoding::standard, true, false>, cons<qi::reference<qi::rule<string::const_iterator, wstring()(), xxxxxxx::parser::white_space<string::const_iterator >, unused_type> const> > > > > > > > >, boost::phoenix::actor<boost::phoenix::composite<boost::phoenix::assign_eval, vector<attribute<0>, boost::phoenix::composite<boost::phoenix::detail::construct_eval<xxxxxxx::ir::carry_op>, vector<local_variable<0>, argument<0>, argument<1>, argument<2>, argument<3>, boost::phoenix::value<boost::optional<wstring> > > > > > > > > > > > > > >, mpl_::bool_<false> >

This string now has 5k characters (still a lot I agree) but its now less than half of the lenght of the original. Looking deeper at a sub section other patterns are visible:

cons<qi::reference<qi::rule<string::const_iterator, wstring()()
      , xxxxxxx::parser::white_space<string::const_iterator >
      , unused_type> const>
      , cons<qi::literal_char<char_encoding::standard, true, false>,
cons<qi::reference<qi::rule<string::const_iterator, wstring()()
      , xxxxxxx::parser::white_space<string::const_iterator >
      , unused_type> const>
      , cons<qi::literal_char<char_encoding::standard, true, false>,
cons<qi::reference<qi::rule<string::const_iterator, wstring()()
      , xxxxxxx::parser::white_space<string::const_iterator >
      , unused_type> const>
      , cons<qi::literal_char<char_encoding::standard, true, false>,
cons<qi::reference<qi::rule<string::const_iterator, wstring()()
      , xxxxxxx::parser::white_space<string::const_iterator >
      , unused_type> const>
      , cons<qi::literal_char<char_encoding::standard, true, false>,
cons<qi::reference<qi::rule<string::const_iterator, wstring()()
      , xxxxxxx::parser::white_space<string::const_iterator >
      , unused_type> const>

Again, 'boost' is using preprocessor tricks to allow a type to be built as if it is a vector. Similar to the case of void_ and nil, C++-0x parameter packs will avoid the need for the preprocessor to expand everything out 10 deep and the templates will be built to hold exactly what the user required. The above string takes up nearly a 1000 characters, and it is just one of 3 or 4 such strings in the original.

So if the question is: Is C++'03 showing its age, then the answer is "maybe" but only because it doesn't yet have template parameter packs.

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I don't think the example you have given is a good example of the language being used "in ways it was never designed to be used". C++'s design explicitly allows for uses such as this. I think what it really shows is some of the language's weaknesses. The way templates and static typing work together in the language result in monstrosities such as your nice example. Even simpler uses of templates can easily result in absurdly long and complicated names. Programmers more familiar with other languages and less familiar with C++ would see things like this and immediately recognize that there's something not quite "right" with C++.

Now it's not to say that C++ is a crap language just because it has some shortcomings. All languages that I've ever used have some disadvantages. In the end, I think your example illustrates one of C++'s weaknesses better than it illustrates C++'s age.

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C was designed in the spirit of "mechanism, not policy"; this means it can cope in strange places, like embedded devices or kernels, where a decent standard library may not be present. It opens up the door to writing portable code (though doesn't by any means guarantee it). Importantly, the language is powerful enough that important things are not treated as special cases (e.g. "printf" is just another function; you don't need special operators to do string formatting or any such). This means that the language can (to some extent) be built by its users, not its creators.

C++ has inherited some of this spirit. And in this spirit, people have made libraries that offer both functionality and fairly succinct syntax.

C++ is still used in cheap embedded systems because it cuts the costs of software development compared to C, but remains reasonably fast (and has actually been ported to the systems). For such reasons I don't think C++ is broken or showing its age.

But trying to turn it into a language suitable for "modern" pursuits is a simple case of using the wrong tool for the job. C++ has a place, but it is taking up a much wider area than it should be due to its historical popularity and momentum.

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Please remember that the original C++ (C with classes) was a hack on C. Its goal was good - enable better organization of C programs by bringing in ideas from the OOP world. The objective was good but the way it was done - bad. C++, over the time, has grown in by piling feature upon feature on its tiny C base, which was designed for simplicity. What will happen if you construct a 100 storey building on a foundation meant for a 2 storey house? That is the disaster happened to C++. It culminated with the confusion around "concepts", which is now out of the new standard. Many of these new features were added to workaround the core C++'s inherent weaknesses. I think a statically typed language cannot be a good vehicle for OOP, at least if you go by Alan Kay's definition of that paradigm. When I use C++ I try to stick to the basic features like namespaces, standard template libraries and exceptions. I will create a C++ class only if an hierarchy of types makes absolute sense in the current context. I just ignore the rest of the 'advanced', complicated stuff.

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2  
templates and exceptions has got nothing to do with classes or OOP. Generic programming and exceptions are nice features any decent language should have, I don't consider them advanced. RAII is not a language feature, but an idiom. So it need not be discussed here. Any complex C++ application can be written using the basic features and I have done it many times. For just one example, please see spark-scheme.wikispot.org. –  Vijay Mathew Sep 3 '09 at 11:27
3  
@Vijay: "Any complex C++ application can be written using the basic features" Of course. It can also be written using assembler. And just as with writing the code in assembly, it will be more complicated, more verbose, more error-prone. –  sbi Sep 3 '09 at 12:59
1  
There is a big difference between C++ and assembler. Now please tell me how not using template metaprogramming will make my C++ program more verbose, complicated and error-prone? Links to some of your simple, concise and clean C++ code demosntrating all the advanced language features will suffice. Note that I have already provided a link to one of my real-world projects to back-up my argument. –  Vijay Mathew Sep 3 '09 at 15:04
1  
@Vijay: Ever use iterators? Tell me how to implement those without these "advanced and complex" features. –  jalf Sep 3 '09 at 21:36
1  
Yes I use iterators, but never had to implement them. Could you please explain the 'advanced features' needed to implement iterators? As far as I understand they involve little more than plain pointer arithmetic. BTW, I am not of the opinion that Boost is a well designed library. For instance, look at the boost threads API. C++ programmers seems to be held up in a strange world where even the simplest tasks are expected to be performed 'ceremoniously'. –  Vijay Mathew Sep 4 '09 at 4:50
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