Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to read a text file into a two dimensional character array. When I call close on the ifstream object after extracting the data, I get a segmentation fault.

This works:

problem::problem(obj *o1, obj* o2, char *state_file)
{
ifstream infile;
string line;
infile.open(state_file, ios::in);
getline(infile,line);
infile.close();
}

This doesnt:

problem::problem(obj *o1, obj* o2, char *state_file)
{

ifstream infile;
string line;

//data is char data[6][7] and is declared in the header
//line is EXACTLY 7 characters lone

infile.open(state_file, ios::in);
for(int i = 5;i >= 0;i--)
{
    getline(infile,line);
    for(int j = 0;j < 7;j++)
        data[i][j] = line[j];
}
cerr << "PROGRAM OK" << endl;
infile.close();
cerr << "The program doesn't get here" << endl;
//Some more constructor code    

}

Why am I getting a segmentation fault when I call infile.close()?

SSCCE version that works with the same input file:

#include <string>
#include <fstream>

using namespace std;

class func
{
    public:
        func(char *);   
    private:
        char data[6][7];

};

func::func(char *state_file)
{
    ifstream infile;
    string line;

    infile.open(state_file, ios::in);   
        for(int i = 5;i >= 0;i--)
    {
        getline(infile,line);
        for(int j = 0;j < 7;j++)
            data[i][j] = line[j];
    }

    infile.close();
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    func *obj = new func(argv[1]);  
    delete obj;
    return 0;
}

From main:

obj *p1 = new obj(&something);
obj *p2 = new obj(&something);

problem *p;

if(argc == 3)
    p = new problem(p1, p2, argv[2]); //SEGFAULTS HERE
else
    p = new problem(p1, p2);

from the header with the class declaration:

public:
    problem(obj *, obj *);
    problem(obj *, obj *, char *);
private:
        char data[6][7];
share|improve this question
    
What if line contains less than 7 characters? –  hmjd Dec 5 '12 at 15:45
    
Sorry for the error. The line will always have 7 characters. –  user1456786 Dec 5 '12 at 15:53
    
Can you provide a full example that will reproduce this: sscce.org What you have posted looks reasonable, but this kind of array kerjiggery is tricky, and there may be something in the code we can't see. –  BoBTFish Dec 5 '12 at 16:01
    
Like this: #include <iostream> #include <fstream> #include <string> int main() { std::ifstream infile; std::string line; std::string state_file="foo.txt"; char data[6][7] = {{0}}; infile.open(state_file.c_str(), std::ios::in); for(int i = 5;i >= 0;i--) { getline(infile,line); if (line.size() != 7) std::cerr << "Line length is " << line.size() << std::endl; for(int j = 0;j < 7 && j<line.size();j++) data[i][j] = line[j]; } std::cerr << "PROGRAM OK" << std::endl; infile.close(); std::cerr << "The program doesn't get here" << std::endl; }& contents of foo.txt. –  Yakk Dec 5 '12 at 16:04
    
Does the code from my comment compile, run, and fail to segfault on your system? (with "foo.txt" replaced with a path to the actual file) –  Yakk Dec 5 '12 at 16:05

2 Answers 2

Are you sure that your file always contains at least six lines?

The usual way to "iterate" on a ifstream is:

ifstream is("test.txt");
string line;
while(getline(is, line))
{
    cout<<line<<endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The input file is more than six lines, the rest are formatted differently and read later. –  user1456786 Dec 5 '12 at 16:14
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I figured it out. The problem had something to do with how the object file was being linked during the build process. Removing all the .o files and rebuilding from scratch solved the problem. Thank you everyone for your input. I apologize for not doing a clean build from the beginning and wasting your time.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.