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Regarding ASP.NET 4.5's new System.Web.Optimization / Microsoft.AspNet.Web.Optimization:

Can anyone explain the difference in the use of bundling resources using the BundleConfig.cs class file as opposed to the bundle.config xml file?

I've seen some articles showing bundling both js and css in BundleConfig.cs, while others showing bundling js in BundleConfig.cs and css in bundle.config.

I guess I don't understand #1) why you wouldn't just do them both one particular way for simplicity - and #2) why anyone would prefer to hard-code resources like that in a class file? It seems like a much more dynamic approach to just put them in an xml file that can be changed on-the-fly if necessary.

It seems like more articles actually lean toward using BundleConfig.cs than anything else. Is there some particular pro or con that encourages this?

Also, if there is any real documentation on System.Web.Optimization, I would love to know the location (because I sure can't find it).

Thanks-

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I see that you marked this as answered but I find the answer your marked doesn't really answer the question. I've read the article and the links it includes and nowhere does it explain why you'd use the class file over the config file or vice versa. Did I miss something in the article or links? –  Robb Vandaveer Jan 31 '13 at 16:10
    
well.. to be honest, i don't know that it really did 100%. I basically took it to mean that using the class allowed the framework to do more dynamic things like swapping from minified-to-non-minified based on debug, replacing {version}, etc.. whereas the xml file was more static. but I did not actually take time to test that theory as I wound up going a different direction. CSS is what i was primarily interested in bundling and minifying, and i'm basically now doing that via the Web Essentials plugin and LESS @import's. –  kman Jan 31 '13 at 18:20
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No, that's not true. The support for auto-swapping minified files and using the {version} placeholder work with the bundle.config file as well. In fact, the framework parses the bundle.config when the app is first started and just calls the same methods that you would use in the class, passing in the values it reads from the .config file. –  Elezar Nov 18 at 18:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

this documentation explains it all better than I ever could

http://www.asp.net/mvc/tutorials/mvc-4/bundling-and-minification

One of the nicest things is this:

The bundling framework follows several common conventions such as:

Selecting “.min” file for release when “FileX.min.js” and “FileX.js” exist.

Selecting the non “.min” version for debug. Ignoring “-vsdoc” files (such as jquery-1.7.1-vsdoc.js), which are used only by IntelliSense.

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Can anyone explain the difference in the use of bundling resources using the BundleConfig.cs class file as opposed to the bundle.config xml file?

The difference is that you would have to read, parse and load the content of the bundle.config at runtime. Hence, using BundleConfig.cs class file could be simpler.

1) why you wouldn't just do them both one particular way for simplicity

Totally agree.

2) why anyone would prefer to hard-code resources like that in a class file?

Simply put: easy to understand.

It seems like a much more dynamic approach to just put them in an xml file that can be changed on-the-fly if necessary.

Yes, but you have to write more code to detect when changes happen and then add/remove/replace existing setup. If done poorly, it could lead to UI issues at runtime.

Also, if there is any real documentation on System.Web.Optimization, I would love to know the location (because I sure can't find it).

Already answered above, but I would repeat: http://www.asp.net/mvc/tutorials/mvc-4/bundling-and-minification

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You don't need to write code to detect changes, add/remove/replace, or parse the .config file. The framework does that for you. Also, I personally think that a single XML file with all the resources is much easier to understand than code the specifies them. –  Elezar Nov 18 at 18:14

As far as I can tell, the accepted answer doesn't actually answer the question at all. It discusses the benefits of the bundling framework, but not how using the BundleConfig.cs is different than using the bundle.config file.

A lot of it comes down to whether you prefer working in code or in markup, but each does have some pros that are specific to that method.

For the bundle.config, there's really only a single benefit, but it is a big one. By using it, you can manage bundles without having to touch code at all. This means that you can make changes without recompiling, making quick deployments easier. Also, it means that your front-end developer, who is going to be most familiar with the files that should be bundled, can define the bundles without having to work with any back-end code.

However, there are quite a few limitations on what you can specify in the Bundle.config. For instance, you can't specify any custom transformations to be applied to individual items or bundles. The only bundle properties that you're able to set are the Path, CdnPath, and CdnFallbackExpression. You can't set the Orderer or EnableFileExtensionReplacements properties. You don't have a way to include a directory including all subdirectories (like you can with the IncludeDirectory method). Basically, there's a LOT of functionality that is only available through the back-end code. Granted, a lot of this you could set by using back-end code to retrieve a bundle that was defined in the bundle.config, and then manipulating. But if you're going to do that, you might as well create the bundle in the back-end, also.

My personal philosophy is to use bundle.config unless I need to do something with the bundle that's not possible that way. However, I do agree that having them all in one place is ideal. If I decide I need to use the class, then I'll use that for all of my bundles of that type (I do sometimes put my JS bundles in the class and my CSS bundles in the .config file, though). I'm sure some completely reasonable people would disagree with that process, though.

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Config file is considered back-end code. I have that confirmed by many front-end developers who consider anything not accessible to the browser is back-end assets. –  Believe2014 Nov 26 at 15:00
    
Also, writing the code explicitly allows you to know exactly when the code is executed, set break points, inspect the input, output and other environment variables. Using bundle.config is recommended, but code is more flexible (put inside IF/ELSE), and even testable. –  Believe2014 Nov 26 at 15:03

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