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In this question i asked how to perform a conditional increment. The provided answer worked, but does not scale well on huge data-sets.

The Input:

<Users>
    <User>
        <id>1</id>
        <username>jack</username>
    </User>
    <User>
        <id>2</id>
        <username>bob</username>
    </User>
    <User>
        <id>3</id>
        <username>bob</username>
    </User>
    <User>
        <id>4</id>
        <username>jack</username>
    </User>
</Users>

The desired output (in optimal time-complexity):

<Users>
   <User>
      <id>1</id>
      <username>jack01</username>
   </User>
   <User>
      <id>2</id>
      <username>bob01</username>
   </User>
   <User>
      <id>3</id>
      <username>bob02</username>
   </User>
   <User>
      <id>4</id>
      <username>jack02</username>
   </User>
</Users>

For this purpose it would be nice to

  • sort input by username
  • for each user
    • when previous username is equals current username
      • increment counter and
      • set username to '$username$counter'
    • otherwise
      • set counter to 1
  • (sort by id again - no requirement)

Any thoughts?

share|improve this question
    
rednammoc, As I warned you, the solution you got from Flynn1179, doesn't keep the original order. I don't think what you want is possible in a single-pass transformation. BTW, you missed to specify the exact wanted result from the transformation -- could you, please, edit the question and provide this? – Dimitre Novatchev Dec 5 '12 at 17:15
    
rednammoc, Didn't I tell you? You got two answers: one straight incorrect and another, whci produces the wanted result, but is O(N^2). If you relax the requirement that doesn't allow a two-pass solution, I can give you an O(N), linear, solution. – Dimitre Novatchev Dec 6 '12 at 3:38
    
@DimitreNovatchev: In future, if you want to claim an answer is incorrect, it's polite to comment on the answer itself to give the poster an opportunity to correct either the answer, or your misunderstanding of it. Given that it clearly says 'no requirement' for the sorting by id afterwards, my answer is hardly 'incorrect', it just didn't meet this optional requirement. – Flynn1179 Dec 6 '12 at 9:39
    
@DimitreNovatchev: i didn't mention that it should be possible in a single-pass transformation. my only requirement is to transform it efficient. i also specified the wanted result (the desired output). Altough Flynn1179 answer is correct, I would be happy if you would post your O(N) solution. Please leave a comment, when you still have the feeling that my question should be edited. – rednammoc Dec 6 '12 at 11:29
    
Do you even read the comments? Or my updated answer? – Flynn1179 Dec 6 '12 at 12:38
up vote 1 down vote accepted

This transformation produces exactly the specified wanted result and is efficient (O(N)):

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
 xmlns:ext="http://exslt.org/common" exclude-result-prefixes="ext">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:key name="kUserByName" match="User" use="username"/>
 <xsl:key name="kUByGid" match="u" use="@gid"/>

 <xsl:variable name="vOrderedByName">
  <xsl:for-each select=
  "/*/User[generate-id()=generate-id(key('kUserByName',username)[1])]">
     <xsl:for-each select="key('kUserByName',username)">
       <u gid="{generate-id()}" pos="{position()}"/>
     </xsl:for-each>
  </xsl:for-each>
 </xsl:variable>

  <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
     <xsl:copy>
       <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
     </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="username/text()">
     <xsl:value-of select="."/>
     <xsl:variable name="vGid" select="generate-id(../..)"/>

     <xsl:for-each select="ext:node-set($vOrderedByName)[1]">
      <xsl:value-of select="format-number(key('kUByGid', $vGid)/@pos, '00')"/>
     </xsl:for-each>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When applied on the provided XML document:

<Users>
    <User>
        <id>1</id>
        <username>jack</username>
    </User>
    <User>
        <id>2</id>
        <username>bob</username>
    </User>
    <User>
        <id>3</id>
        <username>bob</username>
    </User>
    <User>
        <id>4</id>
        <username>jack</username>
    </User>
</Users>

the wanted, correct result is produced:

<Users>
   <User>
      <id>1</id>
      <username>jack01</username>
   </User>
   <User>
      <id>2</id>
      <username>bob01</username>
   </User>
   <User>
      <id>3</id>
      <username>bob02</username>
   </User>
   <User>
      <id>4</id>
      <username>jack02</username>
   </User>
</Users>
share|improve this answer

This is kind of ugly and I'm not fond of using xsl:for-each, but it should be faster than using preceding-siblings, and doesn't need a 2-pass approach:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform" >
  <xsl:key name="count" match="User" use="username" />

  <xsl:template match="Users">
    <Users>
      <xsl:for-each select="User[generate-id()=generate-id(key('count',username)[1])]">
        <xsl:for-each select="key('count',username)">
          <User>
            <xsl:copy-of select="id" />
            <username>
              <xsl:value-of select="username" />
              <xsl:number value="position()" format="01"/>
            </username>
          </User>
        </xsl:for-each>
      </xsl:for-each>
    </Users>
  </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

If you really need it sorted by ID afterwards, you can wrap it into a two-pass template:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
   xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
   xmlns:msxsl="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:xslt">
  <xsl:key name="count" match="User" use="username" />

  <xsl:template match="Users">
    <xsl:variable name="pass1">
      <xsl:for-each select="User[generate-id()=generate-id(key('count',username)[1])]">
        <xsl:for-each select="key('count',username)">
          <User>
            <xsl:copy-of select="id" />
            <username>
              <xsl:value-of select="username" />
              <xsl:number value="position()" format="01"/>
            </username>
          </User>
        </xsl:for-each>
      </xsl:for-each>
    </xsl:variable>

    <xsl:variable name="pass1Nodes" select="msxsl:node-set($pass1)" />

    <Users>
      <xsl:for-each select="$pass1Nodes/*">
        <xsl:sort select="id" />
        <xsl:copy-of select="." />
      </xsl:for-each>
    </Users>
  </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your answer, although i'm not quite sure if it's the optimal one. Your using 2 nested for-each-loops so the time-complexity would be the same as Tim C's solution? – rednammoc Dec 6 '12 at 11:51
    
Approximately, yes. It's essentially a different way of laying out the same solution. To be honest, I think if you need this done efficiently, XSLT is probably not the best way to do it, it's almost trivial to do this in a single pass with any procedural language. – Flynn1179 Dec 6 '12 at 12:20
    
i had the chance to try it out on huge data and the result was there in between seconds! (Without the optional backward-sort ;) – rednammoc Dec 6 '12 at 13:08
1  
I was not able to run this example, because my xslt processor could not use xmlns:msxsl="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:xslt". Therefore this line didn't work: <xsl:variable name="pass1Nodes" select="msxsl:node-set($pass1)" /> In SaxonHE and other 2.0 xslt-processors it works without using the msxsl:node-set() function: <xsl:variable name="pass1Nodes" select="$pass1" /> – Ivo Dec 10 '12 at 14:59
    
Ah yeah, that's the msxml node-set function, you'd probably need xmlns:ext="http://exslt.org/common" in your stylesheet, and use ext:node-set instead, but if you're using XSLT2.0, the whole node-set thing's unnecessary anyway. You can just use the $pass1 variable directly in the for-each in this case. – Flynn1179 Dec 10 '12 at 15:44

Here's a slight variation, but possible not a great increase in efficiency

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform" >
   <xsl:output method="xml" indent="yes"/>
   <xsl:key name="User" match="User" use="username" />

   <xsl:template match="username/text()">
      <xsl:value-of select="." />
      <xsl:variable name="id" select="generate-id(..)" />
      <xsl:for-each select="key('User', .)">
         <xsl:if test="generate-id(username) = $id">
            <xsl:number value="position()" format="01"/>
         </xsl:if>
      </xsl:for-each>
   </xsl:template>

   <xsl:template match="@*|node()">
      <xsl:copy>
         <xsl:apply-templates select="@*|node()"/>
      </xsl:copy>
   </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

What this is doing is defining a key to group Users by username. Then, for each username element, you look through the elements in the key for that username, and output the position when you find a match.

One slight advantage of this approach is that you are only looking at user records with the same name. This may be more efficient if you don't have huge numbers of the same name.

share|improve this answer
    
TimC, Yes, this clearly isn't efficient: O(M^2) where M is the size of the largest group. Taking into account all smaller groups, this is O(N2) where N is the number of User elements. – Dimitre Novatchev Dec 6 '12 at 3:36
    
TimC, thanks for your answer. Like Dimitre already mentioned this isn't the optimal solution. However it's more efficient then the original one and for that matter i pay you my respect. thanks. – rednammoc Dec 6 '12 at 11:37

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