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Okay, there's System and System.Web. Am I correct in that the structure this suggests is:

namespace System
{
    // all of the outer namespace members

    namespace Web
    {
        // all of the inner members
    }
}

And that when a namespace is nested within another, having a using directive with the parent/outer namespace only doesn't automatically bring in the child/nested namespace? In other words:

using System;

public class Example
{
    public Example()
    {
        context1 = new HttpContext(); // won't work

        context2 = new System.Web.HttpContext(); // will work
    }
}

Just trying to see if I actually understand this correctly.

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could nest namespaces and any using directive would only grant access to the members defined within the specific namespace you are referencing.

So from your example:

namespace System
{
    // all of the outer namespace members

    namespace Web
    {
        // all of the inner members
    }
}

Referencing System would grant you access to the outer namespace members and referencing System.Web would grant you access to all of the inner namespace members.

But this is atypical and usually namespaces are defined only once within a file. The dot-notation typically follows a folder or project structure, so files that were nested as such:

WebApplication
    - Models
        - MyModel.cs
    - Controllers
        - MyController.cs

Might use namespaces of WebApplication.Models and WebApplication.Controllers.

I can't think of a great example off the top of my head where you would want to nest namespaces, but there may be a good reason to. However, it would be considered an exception to the rule, in my opinion.

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Chosen as answer for the dot notation clarification. – Major Productions LLC Dec 5 '12 at 16:12
    
I don't think namespaces have anything to do with "referencing" or "access", but that's just me. – Dave Van den Eynde Dec 5 '12 at 18:46

System.Web is declared as:

namespace System.Web
{
    public class HttpContext {}
}

However, it would be possible to actually declare a child namespace:

namespace System
{
    namespace Web
    {
        public class HttpContext {}
    }
}

I have never seen something like this but the syntax allows it and the effect is the same. In both cases, the namespace of HttpContext is System.Web.HttpContext.

Even with the second example, using System; wouldn't import the child namespace, only the types defined in that namespace are imported.

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Ah, so it's a standalone namespace? – Major Productions LLC Dec 5 '12 at 15:59
    
I don't think that really makes any difference. – Dave Van den Eynde Dec 5 '12 at 16:00
    
@KevinM1: In that case yes. But it really doesn't make a difference, please see my extended answer. – Daniel Hilgarth Dec 5 '12 at 16:04

Yes, a using directive only allows types declared in that namespace to be used without namespace qualifier. Nested namespaces are not automatically included.

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As Daniel said, System.Web is not declared separately. System and System.Web are two separate namespaces which are technically unrelated.

That's why your code example of new HttpContext() won't work - because HttpContext is not in the System namespace at all.

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this is a common confusion regarding composite namespaces. Heres a great article of microsoft about it: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms973231.aspx

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