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I have a list of url data in a file that looks like this:

    http://site.com/some/site.htm,12/5/2012 3:30:39 PM
    http://site.com/some/site.htm,12/5/2012 9:30:30 AM
    https://site.com/some/site.htm,12/5/2012 13:30:30 PM
    http://site.com/some/site.htm,12/5/2012 10:30:39 AM

And I want it to look like this:

    http://site.com/some/site.htm,12/5/2012 3:30 PM
    http://site.com/some/site.htm,12/5/2012 9:30 AM
    https://site.com/some/site.htm,12/5/2012 13:30 PM
    http://site.com/some/site.htm,12/5/2012 10:30 AM

Basically to remove the :XX seconds part from the line using sed. I also don't mind if it deletes everything after the minutes as well. I can use sed or cut since I'm using batch file scripting. Can anyone help ?

So far I've tried the following:

sed 's/.*:([^,*]*) AM/\1/g' file.txt
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what have you tried? –  Rubens Dec 5 '12 at 16:06
    
sed 's/.*:([^,*]*) AM/\1/g' file.txt –  Mike Q Dec 5 '12 at 16:07
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Like this sed -r 's/(.*):[0-9]{2}(.*)/\1\2/':

$ cat file
    http://site.com/some/site.htm,12/5/2012 3:30:39 PM
    http://site.com/some/site.htm,12/5/2012 9:30:30 AM
    https://site.com/some/site.htm,12/5/2012 13:30:30 PM
    http://site.com/some/site.htm,12/5/2012 10:30:39 AM

$ sed -r 's/(.*):[0-9]{2}(.*)/\1\2/' file
    http://site.com/some/site.htm,12/5/2012 3:30 PM
    http://site.com/some/site.htm,12/5/2012 9:30 AM
    https://site.com/some/site.htm,12/5/2012 13:30 PM
    http://site.com/some/site.htm,12/5/2012 10:30 AM

Explanation:

(.*):     # Capture everything up the last : (greedy)
[0-9]{2}  # Match the two digits 
(.*)      # Capture the rest of the line

\1\2      # Replace with the two captured groups

Note: -r use extended regular expressions, could be -E dependent on your sed flavor, check with the man.

Edit:

$ sed -r 's/[0-9]{2}:[0-9]{2} /00 /' file
    http://site.com/some/site.htm,12/5/2012 3:00 PM
    http://site.com/some/site.htm,12/5/2012 9:00 AM
    https://site.com/some/site.htm,12/5/2012 13:00 PM
    http://site.com/some/site.htm,12/5/2012 10:00 AM
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AWESOME! THANK YOU SO MUCH!! You are a SED GOD! ha ha. I need this because I need to weed out duplicates, much help! –  Mike Q Dec 5 '12 at 16:17
    
I have to wait 2 minutes to accept your answer, that is how fast you were to respond! :-) –  Mike Q Dec 5 '12 at 16:17
    
Happy to help!! –  iiSeymour Dec 5 '12 at 16:22
    
Just curious, would be hard to just show something like 9:00 AM , 10:00 etc. basically changes the minutes to :00 ? –  Mike Q Dec 5 '12 at 16:58
1  
honestly you are amazing with sed ... I can figure out a lot of technical things but sed expert is a special class of super human... ha ha ... I think I need to find a good sed book if you know of one. Anyway, Thanks again.. greatly appreciated.. –  Mike Q Dec 5 '12 at 17:53
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A simple solution, just look for 2 digits after a colon followed by a space, and replace with just the space.

sed 's/:[0-9][0-9] / /g' file.txt
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A really simple solution:

sed 's/:.. / /' file

But this is probably not recommended as it is too generic, and likely to go wrong if the formatting changes even slightly.

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An alternative solution:

sed -r 's/...( [AP]M)$/\1/' file.txt

Matches on lines ending with a space followed by AM or PM, and removes whatever three characters preceded it.

The $ matches on end of line, the parenthesis keeps the AM or PM so you can reference it with the \1 in the substitution text. The -r command-line option allows use of extended regular expressions (needed for the \1 reference).

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