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I know it doesn't make sense to actually handle an exception thrown in a different thread, but is there some way I can get notified that at least an exception occurred? E.g. something like

#include <QtConcurrentRun>

#include <iostream>
#include <stdexcept>

void MyFunction()
{
//  std::cout << "MyFunction()" << std::endl;
  throw std::runtime_error("Test exception.");
}

int main()
{
  try
  {
    QtConcurrent::run(MyFunction);
  }
  catch(...)
  {
    std::cout << "Exception caught!" << std::endl;
  }

}

exits quietly, even though an exception occurred. This is sometimes very confusing when the exception comes from deep down in the call stack somewhere.

------------EDIT-------------

I tried to write a wrapper like UmNyobe suggested, but I must be doing something wrong with the function pointers?

#include <QtConcurrentRun>
#include <QFutureWatcher>
#include <QObject>

#include <iostream>
#include <stdexcept>

void MyFunction()
{
//  std::cout << "MyFunction()" << std::endl;
  throw std::runtime_error("Test exception.");
}

template<typename TFirstParam, typename... TParams>
bool ExceptionWrapper(TFirstParam firstParam, TParams&& ...params)
{
  // Here 'firstParam' should be a function pointer, and 'params' are the arguments
  // that should be passed to the function
  try
  {
    firstParam(params...);
  }
  catch(...)
  {
    std::cout << "Exception caught!" << std::endl;
    return false; // failure
  }

  return true; // success
}

struct MyClass : public QObject
{
  Q_OBJECT

  MyClass()
  {
    connect(&this->FutureWatcher, SIGNAL(finished()), this, SLOT(slot_finished()));
  }

  void DoSomething()
  {
    void (*myFunctionPointer)() = MyFunction;
    bool (*functionPointer)(decltype(myFunctionPointer)) = ExceptionWrapper;

    QFuture<bool> future = QtConcurrent::run(functionPointer);
    this->FutureWatcher.setFuture(future);
  }

  QFutureWatcher<void> FutureWatcher;

  void slot_finished()
  {
    std::cout << "Finished" << std::endl;
    if(!this->FutureWatcher.result())
    {
      std::cout << "There was an error!" << std::endl;
    }
  }
};

#include "ExceptionWrapper.moc"

int main()
{
  MyClass myClass = new MyClass;
  myClass->DoSomething();
}

The error I get is on this line:

QFuture<bool> future = QtConcurrent::run(functionPointer);

error: no matching function for call to 'run(bool (*&)(void (*)()))'
share|improve this question
    
there is an issue. It is possible that the calling thread finish the execution of the protected code even before the exception occured. –  UmNyobe Dec 5 '12 at 16:16
1  
UmNyobe - what about something with QFuture then? –  David Doria Dec 5 '12 at 16:18
    
run need an object in qt4... –  UmNyobe Dec 5 '12 at 18:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I know it doesn't make sense to actually handle an exception thrown in a different thread, but is there some way I can get notified that at least an exception occurred?

You can handle it by using the future returned from QtConcurrent::run. See this page for details. When you collect on the future, any unhandled exceptions will be rethrown. You can make a simple wrapper class to capture an exception and examine it in the receiving thread.

#include <QtGui>
#include <iostream>
#include <stdexcept>

class MyException : public QtConcurrent::Exception
{
public:
    MyException(std::exception& err) : e(err) {}
    void raise() const { throw *this; }
    Exception* clone() const { return new MyException(*this); }
    std::exception error() const { return e; }
private:
    std::exception e;
};

// first concurrent function
int addFive(int n)
{
    try
    {
        throw std::runtime_error("kablammo!");
        //throw -1;
        return n + 5;
    }
    catch (std::exception& e)
    {
        throw MyException(e);
    }

}

// second concurrent function    
void myVoidFunction()
{
    try
    {
        throw std::runtime_error("oops!");
        //throw -1;
    }
    catch (std::exception& e)
    {
        throw MyException(e);
    }
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    QApplication app(argc, argv);

    QFuture<int> f1 = QtConcurrent::run(addFive, 50);
    try
    {
        int r = f1.result();
        std::cout << "result = " << r << std::endl;
    }
    catch (MyException& me)
    {
        std::cout << me.error().what() << std::endl;
    }
    catch (QtConcurrent::UnhandledException&)
    {
        std::cout << "unhandled exception in addFive\n";
    }

    QFuture<void> f2 = QtConcurrent::run(myVoidFunction);
    try
    {
        // result() not available for QFuture<void>, use waitForFinished() to
        // block until it's done.
        f2.waitForFinished();
        std::cout << "myVoidFunction finished\n";
    }
    catch (MyException& me)
    {
        std::cout << me.error().what() << std::endl;
    }
    catch (QtConcurrent::UnhandledException&)
    {
        std::cout << "unhandled exception in myVoidFunction\n";
    }

    QWidget w;
    w.show();

    return app.exec();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Intesting, thanks! See the edit to my answer above - the exceptions seem to be re-thrown even without using QtConcurrent::Exception? Can you confirm that what I did there makes sense (it seems to work)? –  David Doria Dec 6 '12 at 15:59
    
@DavidDoria Yes that makes sense. Qt will remember an unhandled exception thrown in the concurrent thread and then rethrow it when you collect on the future (using result(), waitForFinished(), et al.). The only advantage you get with using a wrapper as shown in my answer is that you can then examine the exception in the calling thread (I think that was what your question was asking?). Though of course that requires you catch it and store it in the concurrent thread. If you don't actually care about the exception's contents then your edited answer is perfectly fine. –  Gordon Freeman Dec 6 '12 at 16:24

It seems that if an exception is thrown, the isCanceled() of an associated QFutureWatcher returns true:

#include <QApplication>
#include <QtConcurrentRun>
#include <QFutureWatcher>

#include <iostream>
#include <stdexcept>

void MyFunction()
{
  std::cout << "MyFunction()" << std::endl;
  throw std::runtime_error("Test exception.");
}

struct MyClass : public QObject
{
  Q_OBJECT

public:
  MyClass()
  {
    connect(&this->FutureWatcher, SIGNAL(finished()), this, SLOT(slot_finished()));
  }

  void DoSomething()
  {
    QFuture<void> future = QtConcurrent::run(MyFunction);
    this->FutureWatcher.setFuture(future);
  }

  QFutureWatcher<void> FutureWatcher;

public slots:
  void slot_finished()
  {
    std::cout << "Finished" << std::endl;
    if(this->FutureWatcher.isCanceled())
    {
      std::cout << "There was an error!" << std::endl;
    }
    else
    {
      std::cout << "Success!" << std::endl;
    }
  }
};

#include "Exception.moc"

int main(int argc, char*argv[])
{
  MyClass myClass;
  myClass.DoSomething();

  QApplication app(argc, argv);

  return app.exec();
}

--------- Edit (Simplified version of Gordon Freeman's answer) ---------

The exceptions seem to be re-thrown even without using a QtConcurrent::Exception subclass?

#include <QtGui>
#include <iostream>
#include <stdexcept>

// non-void concurrent function
int addFive(int n)
{
  throw std::runtime_error("addFive throw!");
  return n+5;
}

// void concurrent function
void myVoidFunction()
{
   throw std::runtime_error("myVoidFunction throw!");
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    QApplication app(argc, argv);

    QFuture<int> f1 = QtConcurrent::run(addFive, 50);
    try
    {
        int r = f1.result();
        std::cout << "result = " << r << std::endl;
    }
    catch (...)
    {
      std::cout << "exception in addFive." << std::endl;
    }

    QFuture<void> f2 = QtConcurrent::run(myVoidFunction);
    try
    {
        // result() not available for QFuture<void>, use waitForFinished() to
        // block until it's done.
        f2.waitForFinished();
        std::cout << "myVoidFunction finished\n";
    }
    catch (...)
    {
       std::cout << "exception in myVoidFunction\n";
    }

    QWidget w;
    w.show();

    return app.exec();
}
share|improve this answer

The good thing about QtConcurrent::run is that it accepts functions with a return value. My two cents : catch the exception as early as possible...

disclaimer : I am really bad with exceptions in c++ :D

The code which is called in a different thread should return a value. In the case of a void function, or an existing function which doesn't catch exception you can define a wrapper (generic or not). For instance

 int exceptionwrapper(){
   int exception  = 0;
   try
   {
      myFunction();
   }
   catch(...){
      exception = 1;
      std::cout << "Exception caught!" << std::endl;
   }
   return exception;
 }

Then later

 QFuture<int> future = QtConcurrent::run(exemptionwrapper);
 futurewatcher.setFuture(future);

You just use the future watcher to be able to examine the future later, when the function is over.

share|improve this answer
    
UmNyobe - I see what you're saying. This could have a pretty high cost though if I have a lot of functions like this that I want to call. It seems like there should be an easier way to just effectively convert "throw myException" to "cout << myException" (so that it just becomes an error message instead of a real exception) so that nothing needs to be done and I'm not left in this confused state of "it didn't seem to run, but there was no error...". –  David Doria Dec 5 '12 at 16:42
    
yes it is pretty high cost.if you are a template master you can write the wrapper as a template of the same form as QtConcurrent::run which always return an object containing the exception type and the return value of the callee. Or you can use movetothread and signals and slot... –  UmNyobe Dec 5 '12 at 16:50
    
I have added an attempt at such a wrapper as an edit to the question. Apparently I am doing something wrong with the function pointers? Does the structure look ok? (I put everything in a class just so the FutureWatcher would persist since we aren't entering an event loop in this demo). Can you see what I've done wrong? –  David Doria Dec 5 '12 at 17:58

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