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I've been trying for days to get a custom UserNamePasswordValidator to work with my netHttpsBinding for a .Net 4.5 WCF web service. My problem is that the validator never gets called or enforced so any credentials (or no credentials) give access.

I'm pretty sure the configuration is correct because I can use an almost identical configuration for wsHttpBinding and it works. Here is the web.config...

<services>
  <service name="MyNamespace.MyService" behaviorConfiguration="serviceBehavior">
    <endpoint address="" binding="wsHttpBinding" contract="MyNamespace.IMyService" />
    <!-- This one doesn't authenticate 
    <endpoint address="" binding="netHttpsBinding" contract="MyNamespace.IMyService" />
    -->
    <endpoint address="mex" binding="mexHttpsBinding" contract="IMetadataExchange" />
  </service>
</services>
<bindings>
  <wsHttpBinding>
    <binding>
      <security mode="TransportWithMessageCredential">
        <message clientCredentialType="UserName"/>
      </security>
    </binding>
  </wsHttpBinding>
  <netHttpsBinding>
    <binding>
      <security mode="TransportWithMessageCredential">
        <message clientCredentialType="UserName" />
      </security>
    </binding>
  </netHttpsBinding>
</bindings>
<behaviors>
  <serviceBehaviors>
    <behavior name="serviceBehavior">
      <serviceCredentials>
        <userNameAuthentication userNamePasswordValidationMode="Custom" customUserNamePasswordValidatorType="MyNamespace.MyValidator, MyAssembly"/>
      </serviceCredentials>
      <serviceMetadata httpsGetEnabled="true" />
      <serviceDebug includeExceptionDetailInFaults="true" />
    </behavior>
  </serviceBehaviors>
</behaviors>

Here is the validator if that matters...

using System.IdentityModel.Selectors;
using System.ServiceModel;
namespace MyNamespace
{
    public class MyValidator : UserNamePasswordValidator
    {
        public override void Validate(string userName, string password)
        {
            if (null == userName || null == password)
                throw new FaultException("Username or Password were not set.");
            if (!(userName == "MyUser" && password == "MyPassword"))
                throw new FaultException("Unknown Username or Incorrect Password");
        }
    }
}

Does anyone know why a UserNamePasswordValidator doesn't work with netHttpsBinding? Or what I'm doing wrong?

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2 Answers

Try using a NetHttpBinding instead of NetHttpsBinding. You'll still get all the right security mode settings if you keep the TransportWithMessageCredential. I tried this and it works. But yes, if I use NetHttpsBinding, I can reproduce this behavior.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

This doesn't directly answer the question but I ended up ditching netHttpsBinding for a custom binding with binary encoding. It accomplished the same thing as far as I know. A simplified example of my config...

<services>
  <service name="MyNamespace.MyService" behaviorConfiguration="serviceBehavior">
    <endpoint address="" binding="customBinding" bindingConfiguration="CustomBinding" contract="MyNamespace.IMyService" />
    <endpoint address="mex" binding="mexHttpsBinding" contract="IMetadataExchange" />
  </service>
</services>
<bindings>
  <customBinding>
    <binding name="CustomBinding">
      <security authenticationMode="UserNameOverTransport"></security>
      <binaryMessageEncoding />
      <httpsTransport />
    </binding>
  </customBinding>
</bindings>
<behaviors>
  <serviceBehaviors>
    <behavior name="serviceBehavior">
      <serviceCredentials>
        <userNameAuthentication userNamePasswordValidationMode="Custom" customUserNamePasswordValidatorType="MyNamespace.MyValidator, MyAssembly"/>
      </serviceCredentials>
      <serviceMetadata httpsGetEnabled="true" />
      <serviceDebug includeExceptionDetailInFaults="true" />
    </behavior>
  </serviceBehaviors>
</behaviors>
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