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Consider that you land on a category webpage, whose sole purpose it is to direct you to the appropriate sub-category by informing you what's inside each with an image and a short title.

When it comes to UX considerations — it was suggested that the following arrangement would be the most optimal (text before image):

enter image description here

Each photo and text combination would link to the respective sub-category.

Considering semantic HTML5, since these are titles of sub-categories and not exactly captions, would it be appropriate to use the <figcaption> element? Or is something else?


Using figure captions:

<h2>Our Planet's Animals</h2>
<p>Contrary to popular belief...</p>

<figure>
<a>
<figcaption>Rhinos</figcaption>
<img />
</a>
</figure>


Using headers (or something else) instead:

<h2>Our Planet's Animals</h2>
<p>Contrary to popular belief...</p>

<figure>
<a>
<h3>Rhinos</h3>
<img />
</a>
</figure>


Or, what lese would be correct semantically, and allow ease of styling?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think the use of the figure element would not be correct here, as this content is probably the main content of the page, but for figure it says:

[…] but that could, without affecting the flow of the document, be moved away from that primary content […]

You'd use figure if you have a diagram in a paper or a photograph in a news article etc.: content that "[…] is typically referenced as a single unit from the main flow of the document".

Instead, I'd use section for each category and enclose all categories in a nav (because it is the main navigation for that sectioning content, which is opened by the heading "Our Planet's Animals").

<h2>Our Planet's Animals</h2>
<p>Contrary to popular belief...</p>

<nav> <!-- nav could be omitted -->

 <section>
  <a>
  <h1>Rhinos</h1> <!-- you could use h3 here instead -->
  <img />
  </a>
 </section>

 <section>
  …
 </section>

 <section>
  …
 </section>

 <section>
  …
 </section>

</nav>

If you don't want to use headings, one could also use a list for the categories (dl or ul). I think the ul fits better than dl here:

<h2>Our Planet's Animals</h2>
<p>Contrary to popular belief...</p>

<nav> <!-- nav could be omitted -->
 <ul>
  <li><a>Rhinos <img /></a></li>
  <li>…</li>
  <li>…</li>
  <li>…</li>
 </ul>
</nav>

It might also be possible to use section in each li element (<li><section>…</section></li>), but I'm not sure how this would affect the document outline.

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Thanks, good point. However, are you sure section is the right one to use for each? –  Baumr Dec 7 '12 at 12:09
    
@Baumr: If you are using headings, you already create "implicit" sections. Now, if you want to make it explicit, you have the choice between section, article, nav and aside. Each category is by no means an own nav (it's the container, not each link in the container) and neither an aside (as the categories are the primary content). Therefor we'd have the choice between section and article. It wouldn't be wrong to use article here, but I'd only tend to use it if the category would be described in more detail (e. g. an description text standing on it's own). –  unor Dec 7 '12 at 16:22
    
By that logic, yes, however, also div can be considered here. Section carries semantic meaning: html5doctor.com/avoiding-common-html5-mistakes and is reserved for specific cases: impressivewebs.com/html5-section — and I wouldn't say that each image and heading combination has really that much semantic meaning since there's only two elements inside each section. But those are just details really. –  Baumr Dec 8 '12 at 2:35
    
@Baumr: section carries no more meaning than what is implied if you use headings without sectioning elements. Semantically, it doesn't make a difference if you use only headings or if you explicitly use section elements. If you don't want to use a heading for each category, you don't want to use section (but rather a dl). section only matters for the document outline (while the other sectioning elements article, aside and nav carry additional meaning). –  unor Dec 8 '12 at 2:54
    
I see. Also, dl is a definition list... how would this be a definition list? –  Baumr Dec 8 '12 at 19:27

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