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So i have a form that when the user presses submit, the form throws them to a processing file and if any of those fields values dont validate, then that process form sends the user back to the page they came from. I thought it useful to add a message telling them whats wrong so.....

The form page (contact.php) for example is constructed like this (below)

<?php 
$errormssg = stripslashes(str_replace("'","",$_GET['errormssg']));
if($errormssg){
    echo $errormssg;    
} 
?>
<html>
<form fields here >
</html>

and the php process form is constructed more or less like this (below )

<?php 

<form validation code goes here and if it fails, then throws them back to form page exactly 
like this (below)

header("Location:contact.php?errormssg='You seem to have forgotten one of the fields'");



?>

The problem im getting is that, when i first load the contact page, i get an error which im going to assume is because when the contact page is first loaded, $_GET['errormssg'] doesnt exist.

ive tried things like

if($_GET['errormssg']){
    echo $errormssg;
}

And still errors, am i going about this in the wrong way?

All im essentially trying to do is, that when contact page loads, the ONLY way that error message is going to spit out a message is if the user got sent back from the processing form. So if the message exists then echo it in the designated area, else dont show anything.

How can i do this?? thanks in advanced.

share|improve this question
1  
Why is people so reluctant to post actual error messages? – Álvaro González Dec 5 '12 at 16:54
1  
You may already know this and have omitted it to keep the domain private, but header("Location:"...) should contain the full URL. w3.org/Protocols/rfc2616/rfc2616-sec14.html#sec14.30 – honyovk Dec 5 '12 at 17:04
    
Voting to close this as "Unclear what you're asking" on the basis that you refuse to tell us what error messages you're actually seeing, even after being prompted once already. – TRiG Jul 16 '14 at 0:55

You need to check first if the value is defined or not :

if (isset($_GET) && isset($_GET['errormssg'])) {
    echo $_GET['errormssg'];
}

EDIT: According to MrCode $_GET is now always defined. It wasn't when I learnt PHP and never lost the habit since then, sorry for the confusion. You don't need the first part of the if

share|improve this answer
3  
isset($_GET) is pointless. It is always set, however it may or may not contain any elements. – MrCode Dec 5 '12 at 16:55
    
I did not know that. I updated my answer to reflect this, thanks! – koopajah Dec 5 '12 at 16:57
    
As @MrCode points out, it's pointless. Even if $_GET didn't exist (which is not the case), isset($_GET['errormssg']) would be enough. – Álvaro González Dec 5 '12 at 16:58
    
i know what he meant lol, i had put in tthe isset get errormessages. thanks all – somdow Dec 5 '12 at 16:59

Try:

if(isset($_GET['errormssg']))

share|improve this answer

if(isset($_GET['errormssg'])){

This should work :)

share|improve this answer

Try something like:

if(isset($_GET['errormsg']) {
   echo $_GET['errormsg'];
}
share|improve this answer

First, I would like to address the original question. As there are already answers for the obvious isset() .. I would like to point out that 1) You don't need to check for the existence of $_GET prior, it's just wasted code. So the examples such as:

if(isset($_GET['errormsg']) {
  echo $_GET['errormsg'];
} 

are indeed correct usage. I would like to also point out you will get PHP Notices & Warnings anytime you use $_GET['foo'] without it being initialized first. So for example, this will produce a notice: (Note: In the below examples I changed "errormssg" to "errormsg", note the removal of the double "s")

$errormsg = stripslashes(str_replace("'","",$_GET['errormsg']));
if(isset($errormsg)) {
  echo $errmsg;
}

In fact, that code is very redundant, since unless the code changes, $errmsg will always be set. To use this properly, you would want to say something like:

if(isset($_GET['errormsg'])) { 
   $errormsg = stripslashes(str_replace("'","",$_GET['errormsg']));
   echo $errormsg;
}

I would also like to point out the usage of !empty() as well. !empty() is different than isset() that can be demonstrated with the following example:

$x = '';
if(isset($x)) { echo 'This will fire, since $x *is* set, just empty'; }
if(!empty($x)) { echo 'This will not fire, even though $x is set, it is empty'; }

Although for your example, it will only make unnoticeable differences more than likely.

Secondly, although not related directly to the original question, I would like to point out your use of header() and URLs is highly incorrect:

header("Location:contact.php?errormssg='You seem to have forgotten one of the fields'");

This is all wrong. You should instead use something like this:

header("Location: contact.php?errormsg=" . urlencode("You seem to have forgotten one of the fields"));

Note the space between Location: and the URL. Technically, this is still incorrect but will work. The 100% proper way to do it (according to the RFC) would be to include the full URL in the header, such as:

header("Location: http://www.yoursite.com/contact.php?errormsg=" . 
  urlencode("You seem to have forgotten one of the fields"));

You will not need your stripslashes() if you URL escape/encode your data properly.

share|improve this answer

As the other answers have said, you need to check if the variable is set before trying to use it. PHP automatically issues an Undefined index notice if you try to access an array element which is not set.

There are better solutions to your error message system. The drawbacks are that the user can essentially modify direct content on your page through the use of the query string. The first problem is it's vulnerable to XSS so you should pass the message through htmlspecialchars() or htmlentities() to prevent that. Even with no XSS, the user can still set content on your page which is undesirable.

The simplest solution is to use an error code in the URL instead of the whole message. In your PHP you can map error codes to messages. The benefit of this being, the user cannot tamper with the message content, but they can still change the code to produce different messages.

An even better solution would be to use a message queue system based on the session. This would work by storing an array for messages as a session variable. When you need to display a message, you simply add to the array. On your frontend, you can loop over the messages in the session array and output them, then (importantly) clear the array.

This would be better because it's completely isolated from the user, and it would work system or site wide, not just for your contact form. Below is a simple example.

// add a message if validation fails
MesssageManager::addMessage('You seem to have forgotten one of the fields');

On the frontend output the messages in an unordered list and clear them:

<html>

<?php echo MessageManager::getHTML(); MessageManager::clear(); ?>

</html>

The class could look something like

session_start();
class MessageManager
{
    public static function addMessage($message)
    {
        if(isset($_SESSION['messages']))
        {
            $_SESSION['messages'][] = $message;
        }
        else
        {
            $_SESSION['messages'] = array($message);
        }
    }

    public static function clear()
    {
        $_SESSION['messages'] = array();
    }

    public static function getHTML()
    {
        $h  = '<ul>';
        foreach($_SESSION['messages'] as $message)
        {
            $h .= '<li>' . htmlentities($message) . '<li>';
        }
        $h .= '</ul>';

        return $h;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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