Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a float** array that contains num_rows rows and num_cols columns. I'd like to determine the number of occurrences of every number between 0-9 columnwise. To do this, I thought of using another 2D array of size [10][num_cols], so that for each column the number corresponding to an element is the number of occurrences of that number in the original table. Example: if the original table contains 1 2 3 1 1 in the fifth column, then in the second column, the values should be like: 1-> 3, 2 -> 1, 3 -> 1.

I tried using the function as follows, but it gives me a pointer error. I tried using vectors but that too brings no luck.

int ** attribute_count(float * * input, int row_num, int col_num) {
    int ** arr_2 = new int * [10];
    int * arr = new int[10 * col_num];
    int counter = 0;

    for (int i = 0; i < 9; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < col_num; j++) {
            arr_2[i][j] = 0;
        }
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < 9; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < col_num; j++) {
            int temp = input[i][j];
            arr_2[temp][j]++;
        }
    }
    return arr_2;
}

EDIT: I tried your suggestions. The new code is:

    int** attribute_count(float** input, int row_num, int col_num) {
    int** arr_2 = new int* [10];
    int* arr = new int[10 * col_num];
    int counter = 0;

    for (int i = 0; i < 11; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < col_num; j++) {
            arr_2[i] = new int[col_num];
        }
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < 11; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < col_num; j++) {
            int temp = input[i][j];
            arr_2[temp][j]++;
        }
    }
    return arr_2;
}

This still gives me memory errors. The function is being called in the .cpp like this:

int** attr = attribute_count(training_data, 10, num_cols_train);
    cout<<attr[5][1];

Any idea what I'm doing wrong even now?

share|improve this question
3  
What is the exact statement of the "pointer error"? You are not allocating memory to each index in 2D array. –  Coding Mash Dec 5 '12 at 17:28
add comment

3 Answers 3

arr_2 is defined and allocated as an array of pointers to int, but you don't actually assign/allocate those pointers.

Here's a stab at correcting your code - however I'm not convinced you have rows and columns the right way around...

int ** attribute_count(float ** input, int row_num, int col_num)
{
int ** arr_2 = new int * [10];

    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        arr_2[i] = new int[col_num];
        for(int j = 0 ; j < col_num ; j++)
        {
            arr_2[i][j] = 0;
        }
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < row_num; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < col_num; j++)
        {
            int temp = input[i][j];
            arr_2[temp][j]++;
        }
    }
    return arr_2;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Tried, still troubling. Please see the edit I made in the main question. –  Nathan822 Dec 5 '12 at 18:02
    
Your change is not for the better. You now both allocate, and loop, too much. –  JasonD Dec 5 '12 at 18:37
    
Can you write the correct code for this? I am new to this kind of programming and would really appreciate your help! –  Nathan822 Dec 5 '12 at 18:41
add comment

You've only allocated one dimension of arr_2. You need to loop through and allocate an array of ints on each one to get the 2nd dimension.

EDIT: Also, what's up with arr? You allocate it, never use it, don't return it, and don't deallocate it. That's how we spell memory leak.

share|improve this answer
    
Tried, still troubling. Please see the edit I made in the main question. –  Nathan822 Dec 5 '12 at 18:03
add comment

I think your problem is in incorrect allocation of the 2D array. Try

int ** arr_2 = new int* [row_num];
for (int i = 0; i < row_num; i++)
    arr_2[i] = new int[col_num];
share|improve this answer
    
<code>int** attribute_count(float** input, int row_num, int col_num) { int** arr_2 = new int* [10]; int* arr = new int[10 * col_num]; int counter = 0; for (int i = 0; i < 11; i++) { for (int j = 0; j < col_num; j++) { arr_2[i] = new int[col_num]; } } for (int i = 0; i < 11; i++) { for (int j = 0; j < col_num; j++) { int temp = input[i][j]; arr_2[temp][j]++; } } return arr_2; } –  Nathan822 Dec 5 '12 at 17:59
    
Tried, still troubling. Please see the edit I made in the main question. –  Nathan822 Dec 5 '12 at 18:02
    
@Nathan822 Your indexing is very confusing. row_num is usually used to represent the number of rows, and col_num is used to represent the number of columns. While in your code you use 10 for columns number and col_num for rows. Also, the arr variable seems to be unused. –  prazuber Dec 5 '12 at 18:16
    
I am using 10 for row_num, since I want to keep track of the 10 numbers. –  Nathan822 Dec 5 '12 at 18:40
    
@Nathan822 What do you mean 'keep track of the 10 numbers'? In your code you create 2D array arr_2 with 10 columns and col_num rows. Also, you create 1D array named arr with 10 * col_num cells. Note, you don't use arr in your function. What is it's purpose? –  prazuber Dec 5 '12 at 18:51
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.