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Why does result appear to not get reallocated?

  while (loc) {
    char nextLine[MAX_PATH_LEN + 30];
    sprintf(nextLine, "%s:%d\n", loc->item.pathname, loc->item.offset);
    DPRINTF('h', ("got next line\n"));
    while (spaceUsedUp + strlen(nextLine) > allocatedSize) {
      allocatedSize *= 2;
    }
    if (realloc(result, allocatedSize) == NULL) {
      perror("realloc");
    }
    DPRINTF('h', ("Next line length is %d\n", strlen(nextLine)));
    DPRINTF('h', ("Allocated size is %d\n", allocatedSize));
    DPRINTF('h', ("The size of the result is %d\n", strlen(result)));

    strcat(result, nextLine); // THIS LINE CAUSES THE BUFFER OVERFLOW                         

    spaceUsedUp += strlen(nextLine);
    DPRINTF('h', ("SpaceUsedUp is %d\n", spaceUsedUp));
    loc = loc->nextLocation;
  }

The output is:

got next line
Next line length is 21
Allocated size is 100
The size of the result is 0
SpaceUsedUp is 21
got next line
Next line length is 21
Allocated size is 100
The size of the result is 21
SpaceUsedUp is 42
got next line
Next line length is 21
Allocated size is 100
The size of the result is 42
SpaceUsedUp is 63
got next line
Next line length is 21
Allocated size is 100
The size of the result is 63
SpaceUsedUp is 84
got next line
Next line length is 21
Allocated size is 200
The size of the result is 84
*** buffer overflow detected ***: ./proj3/disksearch terminated
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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You are discarding the result returned by realloc. You need to assign that value to result. The typical usage looks like:

if ((tmp = realloc(result, allocatedSize)) == NULL) {
      perror("realloc");
      /* more error handling here, including (usually) freeing result or exiting */
} else {
      result = tmp;
}
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realloc returns a pointer to the reallocated buffer and may free the original buffer. This means that

if (realloc(result, allocatedSize) == NULL)

is wrong as it effectively discards the buffer, leaving you using the old, now potentially freed buffer. The problem you are seeing is not a buffer overflow as such; it is instead a crash caused by the undefined behaviour resulting from attempting to write to memory you no longer have allocated.

You can change your code to

void* tmp = realloc(result, allocatedSize);
if (tmp != NULL)
    result = tmp;
else    
    perror("realloc");
share|improve this answer
1  
If realloc errors, this is a memory leak, as the original value of result is now lost. –  William Pursell Dec 5 '12 at 18:08
    
@WilliamPursell I don't see the problem with my proposed change. Where do you see a memory leak? Or do you mean that the OP's code was leaking the reallocated buffer? –  simonc Dec 5 '12 at 18:09
1  
It is the same problem as: result = malloc(...); result = NULL. If realloc errors, you need to keep track of the old value in result. (Although often an exit or free is done.) –  William Pursell Dec 5 '12 at 18:11
    
Oops, I see what you mean. Thanks, now fixed. –  simonc Dec 5 '12 at 18:12

realloc() return type is void* which is casted to requirement. And this pointer points to new memory of size allocatedSize. Ideally realloc does four operations,

  1. It creates new memory of size specified.
  2. Copies contents from old memory to newer.
  3. Frees the old memory
  4. Returns address of new memory
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Gotta love the man pages, all of lifes answers are there... the important ones anyway.

Return Value
The malloc() and calloc() functions return a pointer to the allocated memory that is suitably aligned for any kind of variable. On error, these functions return NULL. NULL may also be returned by a successful call to malloc() with a size of zero, or by a successful call to calloc() with nmemb or size equal to zero. The free() function returns no value.

The realloc() function returns a pointer to the newly allocated memory, which is suitably aligned for any kind of variable and may be different from ptr, or NULL if the request fails. If size was equal to 0, either NULL or a pointer suitable to be passed to free() is returned. If realloc() fails the original block is left untouched; it is not freed or moved.

As you can see malloc()'s friend realloc() gets its only entry in the man page because of the highlighted part, the value returned from realloc() can be different from the reference to the memory that you pass in. This is an important note.

So in your code here:

if (realloc(result, allocatedSize) == NULL) {
  perror("realloc");
}

You're disregarding the result you really care about. Checking for NULL is good, but you need to assign to some temporary variable and then check.
(note the reason to assign to a temporary variable is in the man page too, if the realloc() fails your result buffer will still be good as long as you don't overwrite it)

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