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I am working in a content management system that uses C# and allows for adding separate code in a central class. One issue that has come up is we would like to have a separate code base for QA and the rest of the site, currently we use the folder structure to switch the call from one class to the other

if (AssetPath == "Websites QA")
{
    InputHelperQA.Navigation();//Calling Navigation Section From Helper Class
}
else
{
    InputHelper.Navigation();
}

But i feel it is a very tedious way of doing this task. Is there a better way of accomplishing this?, obviously just appending InputHelper + "QA" does not work but some thing along those lines where we only have to call the method once instead of having to wrap an if else around the call.

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3 Answers 3

You really shouldn't have separate code for different environments, besides being branches representing your environments.

You really should store your configuration in a config file or database.

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Agreed but since its a cms it tends to be very flat so we only have one environment to work in but have different folders for a qa and live so that is what we are working with –  CPT_Nomis Dec 5 '12 at 18:12
1  
now that's scary. you should have a separate environment for qa. –  Daniel A. White Dec 5 '12 at 18:12

You could do worse than:

1) Have an interface (which you may already have, truth be told)

public interface IInputHelper
{
    void Navigation();
}

2) Derive your two instances as you already have:

public class InputHelper : IInputHelper { }
public class InputHelperQA : IInputHelper { }

3) Create some kind of a dispatch manager:

public sealed class InputDispatch
{
    private Dictionary<string, IInputHelper> dispatch_ = new Dictionary<string, IInputHelper>(StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase);

    public InputDispatch()
    {
        dispatch_["Websites QA"] = new InputDispatchQA();
        dispatch_["Default"] = new InputDispatch();
    }

    public void Dispatch(string type)
    {
        Debug.Assert(dispatch_.ContainsKey(type));
        dispatch_[type].Navigation();
    }
}
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1  
I would take it one step further and use dependency injection to wire up the QA types based on a configuration setting. –  jrummell Dec 5 '12 at 19:19
    
@Moo-Juice that is very interesting it will take me some time to go over and digest this information can you give me an example on how i would call the dispatch manager? Also am confused on the dispatch_["Websites QA"] = new InputDispatchQA(); how does invoking the InputDispatchQA(); know which method to use. Lastly there are more methods Navigation is one of many is it possible to pass that as a variable assuming that both InputHelper and InputHelperQA have the same method ? –  CPT_Nomis Dec 6 '12 at 16:03

I would use Dependency Injection. StructureMap (as just one example) will let you specify which concrete type to provide for an interface via a config file.

http://docs.structuremap.net/XmlConfiguration.htm

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