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I'm trying to scrape data for Miami Heat and their opponent from a table at http://www.scoresandodds.com/grid_20111225.html. The problem I have is that tables for NBA and NFL and other sports are all identicaly marked and all the data I get is from the NFL table. Another problem is that I would like to scrape data for the entire season and the number of different tables changes and the position of Miami changes in the table. This is the code I've been using for different tables till now;

Thanks for any help or advice!

So why is this not getting the job done? Thx for you patience; I'm a real begginer, and I've been trying to solve this problem for some days now, to no effect.

def tableSnO(htmlSnO):
gameSections = soup.findAll('div', 'gameSection')
for gameSection in gameSections:
    header = gameSection.find('div', 'header')
    if header.get('id') == 'nba':
        rows = gameSections.findAll('tr')
        def parse_string(el):
            text = ''.join(el.findAll(text=True))
            return text.strip()
        for row in rows:
            data = map(parse_string, row.findAll('td'))
            return data  

Lately I decided to try a different approach; if I scrape the entire page and get the index of the data in question (this is where it stops:) I could just get the next set of data from the list, since that structure of the table never changes. I could also get the opponent's team name the same way I get the htmlSnO . It feels like this is such basic stuff and it's killing me that I can't get it right.

def tableSnO(htmlSnO):
oddslist = soupSnO.find('table', {"width" : "100%", "cellspacing" : "0", "cellpadding" : "0"})
rows = oddslist.findAll('tr',)
def parse_string(el):
    text = ''.join(el.findAll(text=True))
    return text.strip()
for row in rows:
    data = map(parse_string, row.findAll('td'))

    for teamName in data:
        if re.match("(.*)MIAMI HEAT(.*)", teamName):
            return teamName
            return data.index(teamName)  
share|improve this question
    
What is the type of htmlSnO? Or how do you create the variable that's passed in. –  jimhark Dec 5 '12 at 18:47
    
htmlSnO is a string; I generate it from a different page, where I get some other stats and data. A page that has 'nicer' tables, but not all the data I'm searching for :) –  user1851527 Dec 6 '12 at 9:13
    
In your code for row in rows: you return data inside the loop so only the first row is processed. –  jimhark Dec 6 '12 at 11:43
    
Did you get this working? –  jimhark Dec 8 '12 at 0:05
    
Hey! Sorry for not replying sooner; I did it my way. It took some more time and head bashing against the wall, but I got what I needed. Thanks for help! –  user1851527 Dec 17 '12 at 12:16
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1 Answer

New and final answer with working code:

The section of the page you want has this:

<div class="gameSection">
    <div class="header" id="nba">

This should let you get at the NBA tables:

def tableSnO(htmlSnO):
    gameSections = soup.findAll('div', 'gameSection')
    for gameSection in gameSections:
        header = gameSection.find('div', 'header')
        if header.get('id') == 'nba':
            # process this gameSection
            print gameSection.prettify()

As a complete example, here's the full code I used to test:

import sys
import urllib2
from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

f = urllib2.urlopen('http://www.scoresandodds.com/grid_20111225.html')
html = f.read()
soup = BeautifulSoup(html)

gameSections = soup.findAll('div', 'gameSection')
for gameSection in gameSections:
    header = gameSection.find('div', 'header')
    if header.get('id') == 'nba':
        table = gameSection.find('table', 'data')
        print table.prettify()

This prints the NBA data table.

share|improve this answer
    
Something like what? –  jimhark Dec 6 '12 at 9:23
    
sorry; it's in first post. –  user1851527 Dec 6 '12 at 9:52
    
I'm sorry too. I see it now. You've gone in a different direction. You're basically ignoring all the structure of the data. Web pages tend to change formatting over time so there's so usually you want to depend on just enough structure to get the job done. For example, when I'm scraping links I prefer to filter by matching regexs against the link URL if possible because they tend to change less and are easier to fix than matching the markup. My code shows how to pull out just the NBA section without too much work. But if you can get away with ignoring that hint, then why not? –  jimhark Dec 6 '12 at 10:02
    
Also you asked more than one question. I answered the one that was more interesting to me: "The problem I have is that tables for NBA and NFL and other sports are all identically marked and all the data I get is from the NFL table." Firefox / Firebug and Chrome / Developer tools are great for figuring out the structure of a webpage. I also used Beautiful Soup's prettify: print soup.prettify() and my text editor to quickly search while clearly seeing the structure of the markup. Good luck. –  jimhark Dec 6 '12 at 10:07
    
Your way of aproaching it is smarter for sure, but I cant get it to work. I tried the code you posted - you can see it in first block of code - and it doesn't work. –  user1851527 Dec 6 '12 at 11:02
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