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EDITED: This issue appears in all modern browsers. Testing in Firefox, Chrome, and IE9 all behaves the same. So my JavaScript as shown below works ONLY in older IE versions.

I have a homegrown webhelp system that displays a single help page when it is first launched.

Each help page has a header div that contains a link to display itself in the context of a frameset (I know, I know).

Here is the JavaScript that generates the link:

<script type="text/JavaScript">
    $.noConflict();
        var frameurl="frameset.html?";
        var filename=location.href.substring(location.href.lastIndexOf('/') + 1,location.href.length);
        var truncate=location.href.substring(0, location.href.length-filename.length - 1);
        var subfolder=truncate.substring(truncate.lastIndexOf('/')+1,truncate.length)+"/";
        var newurl=frameurl+filename;
        document.write('<a href="' + newurl + '"><span class="bannerlink">Contents and Search</span></a>');
        </script>

Essentially, it constructs a URL based on the currently viewed page. So the resulting URL looks something like this:

frameset.html?About_account_demographics_xaa_insight.html

And then frameset.html contains the following script to interpret that string and display the correct page:

<script type="text/javascript">
function load() {
var test=(location.href.lastIndexOf('?'));
if (test>0)  {
    var page=location.href.substring(location.href.lastIndexOf('?') + 1,location.href.length);}
else {
var page="about_help.html"; 
     }
document.getElementById("contentwin").src=page; }
</script>

This works as intended in versions of IE up to and including IE8. I can get it to work in IE9 by enabling compatibility mode, of course.

In IE9 proper, the contentwin frame is blank. In all other browsers, the content appears as desired.

EDIT: Here is the frameset code:

 <frameset onload="load()" rows="52px,*" border=0 frameborder=0>
<frame border=0 frameborder=0 src="fis_hdr.html" name="header" scrolling="no"/>
  <frameset border=0 frameborder=0 cols="210px,*">
    <frameset border=0 frameborder=0 rows="50px,*">  
<frame border=0 frameborder=0 scrolling="no" name="searchwin" src="sub/searchbox.html"/>
 <frame marginwidth="5px" border=0 frameborder=0 name="indexwin" src="tocnav.html"/>

</frameset>
<frame border=0 frameborder=0 name="contentwin" src=""/>
 </frameset>
 </frameset> 
share|improve this question
    
Is the url correct in IE9? –  epascarello Dec 5 '12 at 19:46
    
Yes, there is no difference in the URL between versions of IE. That narrows it down, though, doesn't it. If the URL is still being constructed correctly in the html file, then the problem must be with the script that interprets the constructed URL in the frameset. –  Chad Dybdahl Dec 6 '12 at 16:03
    
Debugging indicates that the value of variable page is not getting set in IE9 as it was in previous browsers. SCRIPT5007: Unable to set value of the property 'src': object is null or undefined frameset.html?About_account_demographics_xaa_insight.html, line 22 character 2 –  Chad Dybdahl Dec 6 '12 at 18:48
    
What does the iframe tag look like? –  epascarello Dec 6 '12 at 18:58
    
It's a framset, not iframes. Updating the question with the code. –  Chad Dybdahl Dec 6 '12 at 19:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The solution is the fact you are referencing an id and there is no id with that value.

document.getElementById("contentwin").src=page; }  <-- you are referencing an id
<frame border=0 frameborder=0 name="contentwin" src=""/>  <-- There is no id here!

Add an id to the frame!

<frame border=0 frameborder=0 name="contentwin" id="contentwin" src=""/> 
share|improve this answer
    
This is absolutely the correct solution. Thank you so much. Everything now behaves exactly as expected in all browsers. –  Chad Dybdahl Dec 6 '12 at 22:22
    
So, apparently the reason that this worked in older versions of IE was that it was using the @name attribute as a fallback when @id was not present, which also explains why the page rendered more slowly than I would have liked. Really appreciate your help! –  Chad Dybdahl Dec 6 '12 at 22:27
    
And IE9 dropped that bad habit. :) –  epascarello Dec 6 '12 at 22:48

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