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I have a Non-integral Constant declaration in a class.

I keep getting the following:

ComponentClass.h:14: error: template declaration of const typename ComponentClass<T> ::position NULLPOSITION
ComponentClass.h:14: error: position was not declared in this scope
ComponentClass.h:14: error: expected ; before numeric constant

Please find below my code.

ComponentClass.h

#ifndef _ComponentClass_H
#define _ComponentClass_H

template< class T>
class ComponentClass
{
public:

       typedef ComponentClass* position;
       ComponentClass();
};

template<class T>
const typename ComponentClass<T>::position NULLPOSITION=(position)0;

template<class T>
ComponentClass<T>::ComponentClass(){}
#endif
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closed as too localized by Lightness Races in Orbit, WhozCraig, Anup Cowkur, VMAtm, Alessandro Minoccheri Dec 6 '12 at 8:02

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What are you trying to achieve? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 5 '12 at 18:55
    
Declare a non integral constant class member for a templated class. Anayway I tryed resolved by following jon purdy's answer. thanks. –  geraldCelente Dec 7 '12 at 15:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The reason you’re seeing this error is that position is not in scope in the expression (position)0. You can omit the cast altogether (i.e, 0). If you wanted to include it, you would need to use typename ComponentClass<T>::position as you did in the definition of NULLPOSITION.

You appear to be defining a static member variable without first declaring it in the class like so:

static const position NULLPOSITION;

Then you can define it outside the class as you do now. In order to avoid redundant definitions, however, the typical solution is as follows:

// ComponentBase.h
class ComponentBase {
public:
    typedef ComponentBase* position;
    static const position NULLPOSITION;
};

// ComponentClass.h
template<class T>
class ComponentClass : public ComponentBase { ... };

// ComponentBase.cpp
const ComponentBase::position ComponentBase::NULLPOSITION = 0;

That is, don’t make NULLPOSITION a member of every instantiation of ComponentClass, but instead let all ComponentClass instantiations share a single definition.

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Why would that be? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 5 '12 at 18:53
    
No, he doesn't. –  John Dibling Dec 5 '12 at 18:53
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit: Because he is trying to declare and define a member NULLPOSITION simultaneously outside of the class. The typedef is a red herring. –  Jon Purdy Dec 5 '12 at 18:54
    
@JonPurdy: What makes you think that's a member? Maybe it should be, but it isn't. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 5 '12 at 18:56
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit: there are no non-member template variables in C++. –  n.m. Dec 5 '12 at 19:02

You seem to be trying to define a sort of "template variable", but no such feature exists in C++.

You also failed to qualify the second place at which you write position in that same line of code.

These two factors are the cause of your errors.


It may make some sense for NULLPOSITION to be a static member of instances of the class template:

template< class T>
class ComponentClass
{
public:

       typedef ComponentClass* position;
       static const position NULLPOSITION;

       ComponentClass();
};

But now, as far as I can tell, you have to define it for each T you want to use, which rather sucks:

template<>
const ComponentClass<int>::position ComponentClass<int>::NULLPOSITION =
    static_cast<ComponentClass<int>::position>(0);

template<>
const ComponentClass<double>::position ComponentClass<double>::NULLPOSITION =
    static_cast<ComponentClass<double>::position>(0);

Instead perhaps make position be a bit more clever than a mere pointer type — let it be a proper user-defined type with a default constructor that initialises the object to a "null" state. Function objects work in this way, for example; std::function<void()>() is a valid, but singular function object.

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Though it could've been a cool feature :) –  icepack Dec 5 '12 at 18:56

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