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I am writing a unit test, and one of them is returning a zip file and I want to check the content of this zip file, grab some values from it, and pass the values to the next tests.

I'm using Rack Test, so I know the content of my zip file is inside last_response.body. I have looked through the documentation of RubyZip but it seems that it's always expecting a file. Since I'm running a unit test, I prefer to have everything done in the memory as not to pollute any folder with test zip files, if possible.

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up vote 5 down vote accepted

See @bronson’s answer for a more up to date version of this answer using the newer RubyZip API.

The Rubyzip docs you linked to look a bit old. The latest release (0.9.9) can handle IO objects, so you can use a StringIO (with a little tweaking).

Even though the api will accept an IO, it still seems to assumes it’s a file and tries to call path on it, so first monkey patch StringIO to add a path method (it doesn’t need to actually do anything):

require 'stringio'
class StringIO
  def path
  end
end

Then you can do something like:

require 'zip/zip'
Zip::ZipInputStream.open_buffer(StringIO.new(last_response.body)) do |io|
  while (entry = io.get_next_entry)
    # deal with your zip contents here, e.g.
    puts "Contents of #{entry.name}: '#{io.read}'"
  end
end

and everything will be done in memory.

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Matt's answer is exactly right. Here it is updated to the new API:

Zip::InputStream.open(StringIO.new(input)) do |io|
  while entry = io.get_next_entry
    if entry.name == 'doc.kml'
      parse_kml(io.read)
    else
      raise "unknown entry in kmz file: #{entry.name}"
    end
  end
end

And there's no need to monkeypatch StringIO anymore. Progress!

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You could use Tempfile to dump the zip file into a temporary file. Tempfile creates an operation-system specific temporary file which will be cleaned up by the OS after your program finishes.

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2  
On POSIX systems, the temporary file is already "deleted" when you get it, so there's no clean-up required. It's the closest thing you can get to a naked filehandle to a transient file object. – tadman Dec 5 '12 at 20:38
    
@tadman didn’t know, thanks. How magic is that! – akuhn Dec 5 '12 at 23:46
Zip::File.open_buffer(content) do |zip|
  zip.each do |entry|
    decompressed_data += entry.get_input_stream.read
  end
end
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2  
some explanation can go a long way to encourage understanding rather than copy-paste-move on – MichaelChirico Jul 31 '15 at 22:56

Just an update on this one due to changes at rubyzip:

Zip::InputStream.open(StringIO.new(zip_file)) do |io|
  while (entry = io.get_next_entry)
    # deal with your zip contents here, e.g.
    puts "Contents of #{entry.name}: '#{io.read}'"
  end
end
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Inspired by Matt's answer I have a slightly modified solution for those who have to use 0.9.x rubyzip gem. Mine doesn't require a new class definition.

sio = StringIO.new(response.body)
sio.define_singleton_method(:path) {} #needed to create fake method path TO satisfy the ancient rubyzip 0.9.8 gem
Zip::ZipInputStream::open_buffer(sio) { |io|
    while (entry = io.get_next_entry)
        puts "Contents of #{entry.name}"
     end
}
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