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I'm starting with hmatrix to do matrix manipulation in Haskell. I found It very easy to create matrices:

ghci> let m = (10><10) [1..]
ghci> m
(10><10)
 [  1.0,  2.0,  3.0,  4.0,  5.0,  6.0,  7.0,  8.0,  9.0,  10.0
 , 11.0, 12.0, 13.0, 14.0, 15.0, 16.0, 17.0, 18.0, 19.0,  20.0
 , 21.0, 22.0, 23.0, 24.0, 25.0, 26.0, 27.0, 28.0, 29.0,  30.0
 , 31.0, 32.0, 33.0, 34.0, 35.0, 36.0, 37.0, 38.0, 39.0,  40.0
 , 41.0, 42.0, 43.0, 44.0, 45.0, 46.0, 47.0, 48.0, 49.0,  50.0
 , 51.0, 52.0, 53.0, 54.0, 55.0, 56.0, 57.0, 58.0, 59.0,  60.0
 , 61.0, 62.0, 63.0, 64.0, 65.0, 66.0, 67.0, 68.0, 69.0,  70.0
 , 71.0, 72.0, 73.0, 74.0, 75.0, 76.0, 77.0, 78.0, 79.0,  80.0
 , 81.0, 82.0, 83.0, 84.0, 85.0, 86.0, 87.0, 88.0, 89.0,  90.0
 , 91.0, 92.0, 93.0, 94.0, 95.0, 96.0, 97.0, 98.0, 99.0, 100.0 ]

It's easy, even for matrices multiplications:

ghci> m <> m
(10><10)
 [  3355.0,  3410.0,  3465.0,  3520.0,  3575.0,  3630.0,  3685.0,  3740.0,  3795.0,  3850.0
 ,  7955.0,  8110.0,  8265.0,  8420.0,  8575.0,  8730.0,  8885.0,  9040.0,  9195.0,  9350.0
 , 12555.0, 12810.0, 13065.0, 13320.0, 13575.0, 13830.0, 14085.0, 14340.0, 14595.0, 14850.0
 , 17155.0, 17510.0, 17865.0, 18220.0, 18575.0, 18930.0, 19285.0, 19640.0, 19995.0, 20350.0
 , 21755.0, 22210.0, 22665.0, 23120.0, 23575.0, 24030.0, 24485.0, 24940.0, 25395.0, 25850.0
 , 26355.0, 26910.0, 27465.0, 28020.0, 28575.0, 29130.0, 29685.0, 30240.0, 30795.0, 31350.0
 , 30955.0, 31610.0, 32265.0, 32920.0, 33575.0, 34230.0, 34885.0, 35540.0, 36195.0, 36850.0
 , 35555.0, 36310.0, 37065.0, 37820.0, 38575.0, 39330.0, 40085.0, 40840.0, 41595.0, 42350.0
 , 40155.0, 41010.0, 41865.0, 42720.0, 43575.0, 44430.0, 45285.0, 46140.0, 46995.0, 47850.0
 , 44755.0, 45710.0, 46665.0, 47620.0, 48575.0, 49530.0, 50485.0, 51440.0, 52395.0, 53350.0 ]

But how do I access an element? For example, I would like to read m[10][10] but I don't really know how to do that.

ghci> m[10][10]
<interactive>:30:1:
The function `m' is applied to two arguments,
but its type `Matrix Double' has none
In the expression: m [10] [10]
In an equation for `it': it = m [10] [10]
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1  
When you ask yourself "what function does this operation" and the operation has a simple type signature (guess one that works, if you don't know it), you should always think "Stop! Hoogle time"! (Note that I had to add the +hmatrix to force hoogle to search in that package.) –  dbaupp Dec 5 '12 at 22:55
    
Also think about for a moment whether you really want to read single elements. That's seldom actually a useful thing to do, you'll probably want to use these values for some other computation but chances are it's already implemented in e.g. LAPACK! In my experience, useful final results are almost alway basis-independent, e.g. largest eigenvalues, or vm v for some particular vector v (which is a generelisation of "read out an element". –  leftaroundabout Dec 6 '12 at 8:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You should probably use @@>, which "Reads a matrix position":

λ > let m = (10><10) [1..]
λ > m @@> (0, 3)
4.0
λ > m @@> (3, 0)
31.0
λ > m @@> (9, 9)
100.0
λ > m @@> (10, 10)
*** Exception: matrix indexing out of range   

Note that the indices are zero-based.

You should also probably read the API docs.

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