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Android may auto-delete the files in CacheDir once the system gets low on memory. But the docs say we should not rely on the system clearing this cache, and hence write additional code for polling and deleting.

If this is the case, why should one choose getCacheDir() over getFilesDir()? Both are in-memory, and the latter offers more power to the developer in terms of what to clean up and when.

Thanks!

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because you can use the "clear cache" button in system settings > apps –  zapl Dec 5 '12 at 21:01
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2 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Android may auto-delete the files in CacheDir once the system gets low on memory.

Correct. Third party apps can also delete files from apps' cache directories. And, as zapi notes, the user can manually clear an app's cache from Settings.

But the docs say we should not rely on the system clearing this cache, and hence write additional code for polling and deleting.

Also correct.

If this is the case, why should one opt getCacheDir() over getFileDir() ?

Because the OS, third-party apps, and the user can clear the cache. However, just because those things can clear the cache does not mean that they automatically will clear the cache, and so you need to tidy up your cache from time to time yourself. Similarly, while your mother can clean your room, it is generally a good idea if you clean your room yourself, if you don't want to be hit with a broom.

and the latter offers more power to the developer in terms of what to clean up and when...

No, it does not. getCacheDir() returns a File object. getFilesDir() returns a File object. They are equivalent in terms of "power to the developer in terms of what to clean up and when".

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I didnt get getCacheDir() returns a File object. getFilesDir() returns a File object. Can you please explain –  reiley Feb 27 '13 at 10:34
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@raul8 They both return a File object so the OP seems to be mistaken that getFilesDir() "offers more power to the developer". They both offer the same power. –  Erik Sandberg Nov 21 '13 at 8:17
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getCacheDir() returns the path to the cache files whereas getFilesDir() returns the path to files created and stored in the internal storage of your app. The internal storage is persistent: it cannot be deleted by the system.

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That's the question. Why shouldn't I use getFilesDir() for caching then ? How is getCacheDir() helping me ? –  SlowAndSteady Dec 5 '12 at 19:56
    
I see your point. I see it is a convenience cache storage location on which you can apply a logic without any risk to mess things up because it's separated from your persistent storage. –  NathanZ Dec 5 '12 at 20:06
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