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The Twitter API returns IDs that are 64 bit integers, such as 276403573577891842. I want to see if one Tweet is newer than another by comparing their ID's.

Is there a clever way to compare two 64 bit integers to see which is greater in JavaScript which only supports 32 bit integers?

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4  
You could always split the strings in half before parsing to int, then compare the greater half before the smaller half. –  Paul S. Dec 5 '12 at 19:55
    
Could I ask for an example (jsfiddle?) to see how exactly that would work? Also, so I can accept it as an answer if it does work... –  Justin Dec 5 '12 at 19:56
    
Be prepared for long ununderstandable Mathy answers. Good luck trying to decipher THAT! –  11684 Dec 5 '12 at 19:57
    
Or just do a string compare. –  tjameson Dec 5 '12 at 19:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Assuming the API is returning strings which are then parsed into ints, there are two ways to do this - a split way and a pad way;

Split. The idea here is to split the data into a size the environment can handle. Largest 32-bit number is 0xFFFFFFFF or 4294967295. Now 4294967295..toString().length === 10. So all dec with str length <= 9 should be 32-bit safe.

function compare(a,b){
    var aa = [0,0,0], ba = [0,0,0], i = 3;
    while (a.length) aa[--i] = parseInt(a.slice(-9)), a = a.slice(0,-9);
    i = 3;
    while (b.length) ba[--i] = parseInt(b.slice(-9)), b = b.slice(0,-9);
    if (aa[0] === ba[0]){
        if (aa[1] === ba[1]) {
            if (aa[2] === ba[2]) return 0;
            else if (aa[2] > ba[2]) return 1;
            return -1;
        } else if (aa[1] > ba[1]) return 1;
        return -1;
    } else if (aa[0] > ba[0]) return 1;
    return -1;
}
// a > b: 1, a = b: 0, a < b: -1

Pad. The idea this time is to do a string comparison, but to do that we must first make sure the (string) numbers have the same length; i.e. pad them with 0s. This time '18446744073709551615'.length === 20 so

function pad(str, len) { // Your fav. padding fn
    var pre = '0';
    len = len - str.length;
    while (len > 0) {
        if (len & 1) str = pre + str;
        len >>= 1;
        pre += pre;
    }
    return str;
};

a = pad('276403573577891842',20);
b = pad('50',20);

Now you can use a === b, a < b, a > b so normal (except you're using strings and not int).

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Is one method faster or more efficient? –  Justin Dec 5 '12 at 21:54
    
By this jsperf, pad (I did include a very fast padding algorithm). The one you use may depend on what you're trying to achieve though. –  Paul S. Dec 5 '12 at 22:41

doing a text < or > comparison should work without any problems if they are indeed numbers where the highest numerical id is the newest tweet and the lowest id is the oldest

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Here is what I used based on the accepted answer:

Just call it like this: if( compare_64('124567891234567890', '>', '124567891234567891') )

function compare_64(a, type, b)
{
var result = false;

var pad_len = (a.length > b.length) ? a.length : b.length;      
var aa = pad(a, pad_len);       
var bb = pad(b, pad_len);

switch(type)
{
    case '<':   
        result = (aa < bb) ? true : false;
        break;
    case '<=':  
        result = (aa <= bb) ? true : false;
        break;
    case '>':   
        result = (aa > bb) ? true : false;
        break;
    case '>=':  
        result = (aa >= bb) ? true : false;
        break;                      
    case '==':  
        result = (aa == bb) ? true : false;
        break;          
}   
return result;
}

// Pad with zeros
function pad(str, len)
{
  var pre = '0';
  len = len - str.length;
  while (len > 0)
{
    if (len & 1) str = pre + str;
    len >>= 1;
    pre += pre;
  }
  return str;
}
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If all else fails, you can always just store the ID as a string and split it into two halves which you can then compare separately as integers.

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