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I have the following data in a text file.

10993   39750   11002
10993   39751   10995
10993   39752   48981
10993   39750   344417  79600
10985   39750   344417  475879
110010  39750   59816

What unix commands I can use to do something like "SELECT LAST_COLUMN WHERE FIRST_COLUMN = '10993'" then the result would be:

11002
10995
48981
79600
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5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Seeing as you've tagged your question with perl, here are some examples for that:

Hardcoded in perl:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

open INFILE,"<somefilename";
while (<INFILE>)
{
    my @cols = split(/\s+/,$_);
    if ($cols[0] eq '10993') {      print $cols[-1] . "\n"; }
}

Again using perl, but taking it from STDIN instead, so you can just pipe output to it:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

while (<>)
{
    my @cols = split(/\s+/,$_);
    if ($cols[0] eq '10993') {      print $cols[-1] . "\n"; }
}

Yet another example in perl, taking filename as the first arguement and the required first field as second arguement:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

unless ($ARGV[0])    { die "No filename specified\n" }
unless ($ARGV[1])    { die "No required field specified\n" }
unless (-e $ARGV[0]) { die "Can't find file $ARGV{0]\n" }
open INFILE,"<ARGV{0]";
while (<INFILE>)
{
    my @cols = split(/\s+/,$_);
    if ($cols[0] eq $ARGV[1]) {     print $cols[-1] . "\n"; }
}

However, it's probably easier to just use awk:

awk '{if ($1 == 10993) {print $NF}}' someFileName
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In awk it'd just be awk '$1 == 10993 {print $NF}' someFileName –  Ed Morton Dec 5 '12 at 21:36
    
Consider using the three-argument form of open, lexical variables for file handles, and handling open errors. Also, you could use a construct like: -e $ARGV[0] or die "Can't find file $ARGV{0]\n"; which avoids using unless. –  Kenosis Dec 5 '12 at 21:50

Don't know about perl but here is an awk solution:

awk '$1==10993 {print $NF}' file
11002
10995
48981
79600
share|improve this answer
    
If the ID is variable, use awk -v id=10993 '$1==id {print $NF}' file –  glenn jackman Dec 5 '12 at 22:10

Perl has an awkish autosplit mode that allows a simple solution to your problem.

-a

turns on autosplit mode when used with a -n or -p. An implicit split command to the @F array is done as the first thing inside the implicit while loop produced by the -n or -p.

perl -ane 'print pop(@F), "\n";'

is equivalent to

while (<>) {
    @F = split(' ');
    print pop(@F), "\n";
}

An alternate delimiter may be specified using -F.

Putting it to work in your case looks like

$ perl -lane 'print $F[-1] if $F[0] == 10993' input
11002
10995
48981
79600
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I dont think when you can do using command line you should prefer a script for it.

perl -F -lane 'if($F[0]==10993){print $F[(scalar @F)-1]}' your_file

Tested Below:

> cat temp
10993   39750   11002
10993   39751   10995
10993   39752   48981
10993   39750   344417  79600
10985   39750   344417  475879
110010  39750   59816
> perl -F -lane 'if($F[0]==10993){print $F[(scalar @F)-1]}' temp
11002
10995
48981
79600
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One of the many possible ways is awk:

awk '-F\t' 'if ($1 == "wanted-first-column-value") { print $NF }'
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not sure why, with Awk, I always have to use BEGIN{} in order to specify the field separtor. awk 'BEGIN{FS="\t"}{}{ if ($1 == "wanted-first-column-value") { print $NF } }' –  jjennifer Dec 5 '12 at 20:41
    
@jennifer Then you're probably using old, broken awk. Do not use that awk! –  Ed Morton Dec 5 '12 at 21:29
    
@MoritzBunkus - rewrite that as awk -F'\t' '$1 == "wanted-first-column-value" { print $NF }'. –  Ed Morton Dec 5 '12 at 21:29
    
From the shell's point of view -F'\t' and '-F\t' are identical. The { ... } around everything else is superfluous, yes, but it still works just as I've written it. –  Moritz Bunkus Dec 5 '12 at 21:44
1  
You could add several more layers of "if"s, parentheses and move the quotes to other unlikely locations and it'd still "work" too, but why not keep it simple and use the awk language as intended? –  Ed Morton Dec 5 '12 at 21:50

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