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If I have code like so:

public T ExecuteQuery<T>(Func<IDataReader, T> getResult, string query, params IDataParameter[] parameters)
{
        using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(this.DefaultConnectionString))
        {
            conn.Open();

            // Declare the parameter in the query string
            using (SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand(query, conn))
            {
                foreach (var parameter in parameters)
                {
                    command.Parameters.Add(parameter);
                }

                command.Prepare();

                using (SqlDataReader dr = command.ExecuteReader())
                {
                    return getResult(dr);
                }
            }
        }
    }

    public string GetMySpecId(string dataId)
    {
        return ExecuteQuery(
            dr =>
            {
                if (dr.Read())
                {
                    return dr[0].ToString();
                }

                return string.Empty;
            },
            @"select ""specId"" from ""MyTable"" where ""dataId"" = :dataId",
            new SqlParameter("dataId", dataId));
    }
}

How do I ensure that the

new SqlParameter("dataId", dataId)); 

piece of code is passing in a text or maybe an integer? Also how does the @"select..." actually work as I'm familiar to:

 select id from mytable where dataId = @dataID;
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@"select" appears to just be part of a literal string –  emd Dec 5 '12 at 20:16
    
so is this parameterized correctly? –  chris Dec 5 '12 at 20:18

1 Answer 1

I'm not sure that's parameterized properly. Take a look at the below modified code that will ensure the parameters are added properly and simplify the construction of the call to ExecuteQuery (in my opinion of course). This is pretty straight forward. The select statement is parameterized properly because it's using the @varname syntax:

"select \"specId\" from \"MyTable\" where \"dataId\" = @dataId"

Further, the parameters are typed properly because of the AddWithValue method:

command.Parameters.AddWithValue(parameter.Key, parameter.Value);

Finally, using the dictionary to send in the parameters keeps it pretty simple to construct the parameters from any structure, whether that be parameter values, or even an object.

public T ExecuteQuery<T>(Func<IDataReader, T> getResult, string query, Dictionary<string, object> parameters)
{
    using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(this.DefaultConnectionString))
    {
        conn.Open();

        // Declare the parameter in the query string
        using (SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand(query, conn))
        {
            foreach (var parameter in parameters)
            {
                command.Parameters.AddWithValue(parameter.Key, parameter.Value);
            }

            command.Prepare();

            using (SqlDataReader dr = command.ExecuteReader())
            {
                return getResult(dr);
            }
        }
    }
}

public string GetMySpecId(string dataId)
{
    return ExecuteQuery(
        dr =>
        {
            if (dr.Read())
            {
                return dr[0].ToString();
            }

            return string.Empty;
        },
        "select \"specId\" from \"MyTable\" where \"dataId\" = @dataId",
        new Dictionary<string, object>() { { "@dataId", dataId } });
}

P.S. - the @ before the string in your example is just an escape sequence used in C#.

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