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I've got a problem. I need to get things like day of year, day of month, month of year etc. I use this code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <time.h>
int main(void)
{    
    time_t liczba_sekund;
    struct tm strukt;
    time(&liczba_sekund);
    localtime_r(&liczba_sekund, &strukt); 
    printf("today is %d day of year\nmonth is %d, month's day %d\n", strukt.tm_yday+1, strukt.tm_mon+1, strukt.tm_mday); 
    return 0;
}

First thing: why does gcc -std=c99 -pedantic -Wall return this warning:

My input: gcc test_data.c -o test_data.out -std=c99 -pedantic -Wall

Output:

test_data.c: In function ‘main’:

test_data.c:11:3: warning: implicit declaration of function ‘localtime_r’ [-Wimplicit-function-declaration]

Second thing: how to make it work on windows? While trying to compile it using Dev-C, I got this: http://imgur.com/U7dyE

@@EDIT -------------------- I have found an example for your localtime suggestion:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <time.h>

int main ()
{
    time_t time_raw_format;
    struct tm * ptr_time;

    time ( &time_raw_format );
    ptr_time = localtime ( &time_raw_format );
    printf ("Current local time and date: %s", asctime(ptr_time));
    return 0;
}

How can I change this to date format like this: 5.12.2012 or 5-12-2012? And how to get the day of the year?

I would love if the solution worked both on windows and linux.

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Have you tried en.cppreference.com/w/c/chrono/localtime ? –  Nate Kohl Dec 5 '12 at 20:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

localtime_r is not part of the C standard. Maybe you were looking for localtime?

localtime_r is really available on many linux systems:

Thread-safe versions asctime_r(), ctime_r(), gmtime_r() and localtime_r() are specified by SUSv2, and available since libc 5.2.5

However, since it isn't part of the standard you cannot use it on Windows.

How can I change this to date format like this: 5.12.2012 or 5-12-2012? And how to get the day of the year?

You have to use strftime instead of asctime:

int main ()
{
    time_t time_raw_format;
    struct tm * ptr_time;
    char buffer[50];

    time ( &time_raw_format );
    ptr_time = localtime ( &time_raw_format );
    if(strftime(buffer,50,"%d.%m.%Y",ptr_time) == 0){
        perror("Couldn't prepare formatted string");
    } else {
        printf ("Current local time and date: %s", buffer);
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Actually, in C99, implicit int return type is no longer part of the spec. Some compilers e.g. clang complain about this if it is in pedantic mode. –  dreamlax Dec 6 '12 at 5:15
    
@dreamlax: Woops. Up to which standard was the implicit return type part of the spec? –  Zeta Dec 6 '12 at 5:50
    
It was part of C89, but the introduction of the C99 standard mentions the removal of it. The same with implicit int argument types. –  dreamlax Dec 6 '12 at 7:29

localtime on Windows should be thread-safe per: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bf12f0hc%28VS.80%29.aspx

Both the 32-bit and 64-bit versions ofgmtime, mktime, mkgmtime, and localtimeall use a single tm structure per thread for the conversion. Each call to one of these routines destroys the result of the previous call.

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