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Does the placing of default statement affect efficiency in Java? Is there difference between:

switch (a) {
case 0: return 0;
case 1: default: return -1;
case 2: return 2
...
case 99: return 99;
}

vs

switch (a) {
case 0: return 0;
case 1: return -1;
case 2: return 2;
...
case 99: return 99;
default: return -1;
}
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Before beginning optimisation, use a profiler to get numbers of what parts to profile. – dutt Dec 5 '12 at 20:50
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Even in the most naive implementation this cannot produce a difference in performance, but with Java you are so far removed from the actual machine code this will turn into that you should definitely never even attempt to optimize this or any other similar piece of code. In fact, even if you wrote the dumbest cascade of else-ifs, you'd still stand a solid chance of JIT turning that into a superfast hash-lookup-based machine code.

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Note that if case:1 was removed from the first example, then the respective case could be slowed down. – Jan Dvorak Dec 5 '12 at 20:52
    
@JanDvorak How do you figure that? Without case 1 you'd just have a plain default clause. The placement of default is irrelevant, the semantics will be identical, and the bytecode, too, probably. – Marko Topolnik Dec 5 '12 at 20:55
    
Without case:1 you can find the correct case quickly because you don't have to loop over all cases. This might not matter in Java (if it uses hash tables) but it certainly matters in some other languages. – Jan Dvorak Dec 5 '12 at 21:03
    
@JanDvorak Even at the bytecode level there are direct lookup instructions, so there would definitely be no looping involved. Optimized switch intimately depends on expression's static type, so JavaScript can't do better than keep the semantics, but destroy the performance. Kind of misses the point of the construct, though. – Marko Topolnik Dec 5 '12 at 21:05
    
I guess this kinda sheds bad light on Javascript performance of dynamic switch statements. – Jan Dvorak Dec 5 '12 at 21:06

No, it won't make a difference. Why? Because of this: When does the JVM know that it has to use the default body? After it checked all the other cases. So placing default: at a specific location in the which won't change performance.

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I don't believe you'd see any significant performance improvements if you wrote a quick test program. At least none that would justify obscuring your code. I'd just leave the default case neatly last in the list to keep the code more readable. It's probably more important than a micro improvement in performance (if any at all)

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No. The location of the switch statement makes no difference to the generated byte code other than the debugging annotations.

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That's not quite true. I've just compiled both versions, and my compiler produces different bytecodes for the two. The difference is, of course, tiny. – NPE Dec 5 '12 at 20:53
    
@NPE what is the difference? Just a different jump target and duplicated code? – Jan Dvorak Dec 5 '12 at 20:56
    
@JanDvorak: Precisely. Note that I am not claiming that this is of any practical importance. :) – NPE Dec 5 '12 at 20:59

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