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At an older job I worked on a website that had the following deploy process:

1) Check out part of site you want to edit from svn

2) Perform changes

3) Check in changes with relevant message

4) Execute script to update production website with what I assume is the svn export command

Fast forward to today. I would like to do something very familiar to the former site, but with the added twist that the web site will be built on my own CMS system. Essentially, most text/images of the site are editable by admin users (to add FAQ questions, fix typos, change content from time) using an admin interface of my own design. The current content of the site would be stored in a MySQL database. That content is pulled with a PHP MVC framework for every user request. I would like to version everything so that if an admin user were to really screw up in the editing process, we could simply roll back to an older version. Is something like this possible with svn/mysql/php?

I can see how if the files were static html files, everything would be all cool, but I am kind of missing how I could version the database, the php files (this in case of structural changes made by me the actual programmer) all together into a cohesive system. Does anybody have any advice, articles, suggested books, etc that may help me design this conceptually

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closed as off topic by j08691, Jocelyn, chris, elusive, Graviton Dec 7 '12 at 11:16

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For those voting for a close, if you believe it is too broad for stackoverflow, please at least vote for it to be moved to programmers.stackexchange. I thought the the fact that it involved a large scope of fields that involve specific knowledge in said fields necessitated a coder's opinion, but wherever people deem I can get the best answers, I will be willing to relegate myself there. –  thatidiotguy Dec 6 '12 at 3:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You simply need to setup a revision system as part of your CMS. So whenever edits are made to a piece of content instead of it only editing the content record directly you have a second table that stores a new revision for that content. Then at any point you can go to your revisions and pull that information to overwrite the current values in your content. If you need an example you might want to look at Drupal, they do this pretty well. Here is a very simple example:

tbl_article {
    int id primary key,
    varchar(100) title,
    text body
}

tbl_article_revision {
    int id primary key,
    int article_id,
    varchar(100) title,
    text body
}

So you can create new revisions at any point and then whenever you are ready just to make a revision live, just have it overwrite the values in the tbl_article. Or you can store nothing in tbl_article and just have a pointer to the revision table like this:

tbl_article {
    int id primary key,
    int article_revision_id
}

tbl_article_revision {
    int id primary key,
    int article_id,
    varchar(100) title,
    text body
}
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Ah I see. Very cool idea. Perhaps I could add a TIMESTAMP field to tbl_article_revision to keep track of them beyond primary key? –  thatidiotguy Dec 5 '12 at 21:05
    
Yeah as I said that was just a really simple example. –  Pitchinnate Dec 5 '12 at 21:07
    
Obviously you would still use SVN to store changes that you would make to the php code. –  Pitchinnate Dec 5 '12 at 21:11
    
Right, I could then just use the repository we have on our network, and push changes via FTP. I like this! Could very well be the answer. I'll wait a few more hours to see what other people think, but I really like this. Thank you for your input. –  thatidiotguy Dec 5 '12 at 21:13

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