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About a week ago I started having troubles getting a decent backtrace from a core dump using GDB. If I load the program in GDB and have it crash, I can get a backtrace fine.

This is what I get when doing it from a core dump:

(gdb) bt
#0  0x00007fd10ad42425 in ?? ()
#1  0x00007fd10ad45b8b in ?? ()
#2  0x0000000000000004 in ?? ()
#3  0x0000000000000005 in ?? ()
#4  0x00007ffff770887e in ?? ()
#5  0x0000000000000009 in ?? ()
#6  0x00007fd10ae87ea7 in ?? ()
#7  0x0000000000000003 in ?? ()
#8  0x00007ffff77072ba in ?? ()
#9  0x0000000000000006 in ?? ()
#10 0x00007fd10ae87eab in ?? ()
#11 0x0000000000000002 in ?? ()
#12 0x00007ffff77072ce in ?? ()
#13 0x0000000000000002 in ?? ()
#14 0x00007fd10ae85b82 in ?? ()
#15 0x0000000000000001 in ?? ()
#16 0x00007fd10ae87ea7 in ?? ()
#17 0x0000000000000003 in ?? ()
#18 0x00007ffff77072b4 in ?? ()
#19 0x000000000000000c in ?? ()
#20 0x00007fd10ae87eab in ?? ()
#21 0x0000000000000002 in ?? ()
#22 0x0000000000000020 in ?? ()
#23 0x0000000000000000 in ?? ()
(gdb) 

This happens regardless of whether it's a SIGSEGV, SIGABRT (Unhandled exception or assert/verify).

I am compiling with the following compiler flags:

g++ -Wall -Wextra -g -ggdb -std=gnu++0x -rdynamic -pthread -O0

I can't really think of anything that has changed to be causing this. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
Why would you still be able to get a backtrace inside gdb (no core dump) then? Shouldn't a corrupt stack cause the same problem there? –  Troy Dec 5 '12 at 21:01
1  
What's you gdb command line? To state the obvious, are you giving it the right executable...? –  Nicholas Wilson Dec 5 '12 at 21:01
    
Damn. I just realised what the problem is. Old core file isn't being overwritten. I just presumed the core file was the current one. stackoverflow.com/questions/12666801/… –  Troy Dec 5 '12 at 21:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Turns out that despite the "core dumped" message, if there was an older existing core file, it wasn't being overwritten. This is apparently a ubuntu bug according to this:

Why is my core file not overwritten?

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2  
In case you want to distingish between core files, the following might be handy: /sbin/sysctl -w "kernel.core_pattern=core.%e.%p". This will name core files like 'core.my_program.12345'. %e is het executable name, %p the process ID. –  JvO Dec 5 '12 at 23:18
    
nice, this might prevent future confusion ;) –  Troy Dec 5 '12 at 23:38
    
JvO : That's nice, just to improvise further is there any way to add time stamp ? –  ZEN.Kamath Dec 6 '12 at 7:29

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