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    void printMatrix(int matrix[][], int edge)
{
    int i,j;
    for (i=0; i<edge; ++i) {
        for (j=0; j<edge; ++j) {
        std:cout<<matrix[i][j]<<" ";
        }
        std::cout<<std::endl;
    }
}

seems fine if i do in java, but in c++, it indicate Subscript of pointer to incomplete type 'int []'

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1  
Without knowing one dimension of the array, it's not possible to know where its members are. Use an appropriate C++ class from the STL. –  David Schwartz Dec 5 '12 at 21:15
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

using one dimentional array, as ls. and caculate the dimention by yourself

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When you pass a multi-dimensional array to a function, you must fill in all its dimensions, except the first one. That is arr[][X], arr[][X][Y], ....

The compiler knows how to do the array locations math according to the dimensions. For example, arr[][5] means every row contains 5 elements, so arr[2][0] will take it 10 elements from the start. So the first dimension isn't necessary, but all the others - are.

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??????????????????? –  stackover Dec 5 '12 at 23:25
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You shouldn't use raw arrays at all. std::array is much better. If you want the size to not be part of the type, you should use std::vector. There are cases where you might need to use a raw array or raw pointer, but this isn't something you should be worrying about as a beginner.

Here's an example of how you might do things (assuming C++11 support). This uses const correctness and the new foreach feature as well. I don't remember the exact syntax but it should look something like this.

void printMatrix(const std::vector<std::vector<int>> matrix)
{
    for(const auto& row : matrix){
        for(int x : row){
            std::cout << x << " ";
        }

        std::cout<<std::endl;
    }
}
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It is? I wouldn't say so. Especially considering std::arrayis far from being supported everywhere and it adds overhead, whereas you might be far better off using some static array and/or pointer. –  Mario Dec 5 '12 at 21:17
1  
Sorry, I guess I was exaggerating. Also, since it's a template, I don't think it will add runtime overhead, though it may slow compilation down a little. –  Antimony Dec 5 '12 at 21:19
    
Actually never used it, but read up a bit on it, and it seems that there's indeed no overhead - it's just squeezing an array in its container struct storing its own length as well. So just some more safety. –  Mario Dec 5 '12 at 21:20
    
@mario, actually, you can always easily replace std::array by the one frome boost, support shouldn't really be an issue. –  KillianDS Dec 5 '12 at 21:28
    
If you can (and want) to resort to collections like boost, yes. –  Mario Dec 5 '12 at 21:34
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C++ does not pass the size of an array or the number of dimensions, it only passes the address of the start of the array (i.e. a pointer). You can get around this by using a template function with a reference. This way the size of the matrix is known at compile time.

template<int X, int Y>
void printMatrix(int (&matrix)[X][Y], int edge)
{
    int i,j;
    for (i=0; i<edge; ++i) {
        for (j=0; j<edge; ++j) {
        std:cout<<matrix[i][j]<<" ";
        }
        std::cout<<std::endl;
    }
}
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If you're using templates you might as well just use std::array. –  Antimony Dec 5 '12 at 21:23
    
@Antimony, suppose you're just trying to do a quick dump in the middle of an existing large codebase? –  Mark Ransom Dec 5 '12 at 21:32
    
@Antimony: If you are using C++ templates is an integral part of the language. Coding without them is not using C++. The idea of this site is not just to give one of bla answers that sort of fix the problem but rather to give real solution that will solve the problem in a potentially better way. If I was coding this up this is exactly how I would write this function if my input was some fixed C arrays from legacy code. –  Loki Astari Dec 5 '12 at 21:45
    
@Loki array and vector ARE templates. –  Antimony Dec 5 '12 at 22:30
    
@Antimony: I think you are missing our point here. –  Loki Astari Dec 6 '12 at 0:06
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If you have a square matrix, you can do it this way:

void printMatrix(int matrix[], int edge)
{
    int i,j;
    for (j=0; j<edge; ++j) {
        for (i=0; i<edge; ++i) {
            std:cout << matrix[j*edge + i] << " ";
        }
        std::cout << std::endl;
    }
}

Essentially, store rows (or columns, it's up to you) one after another in a 1D array. Note that the inner loop iterates over j - this way the loop accesses consecutive cells in memory.

The rest of your code should then use the same convention.

This approach isn't the best if you're paid (or given points) for every class, template, design pattern etc. you add to your code, though.

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