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Is there a way to hide/show a method if a certain constructor is used? i.e.:

public class SomeClass
{
    public SomeClass(string methodA)
    {

    }

    public SomeClass(int methodB)
    {

    }

    public string MethodA()
    {
        return "";
    }

    public int MethodB()
    {
        return 0;
    }
}

if SomeClass(string methodA) is used, then only MethodA() is available when I instance a new SomeClass object? The same when SomeClass(int methodB) is used, then MethodB() would be available?

Thank you all!

share|improve this question
    
you need to subclass your class and have the methods in corresponding classes accordingly. – DarthVader Dec 5 '12 at 21:50
    
You need to improve your OOP knowledge. I'm sure you should use base class and two childs classes that inherited the base. Each child with a different constructor. In the other hand, show or hide? In what scope? The only visual way is in Visual Studio intellisense... In the scope of the public, private, etc... or in something like role or membership? – Alberto León Dec 5 '12 at 21:55
up vote 5 down vote accepted

No, it's not possible.

What's more likely is that you want to use generics:

public interface IFoo<T>
{
    T Method();
}

public class IntFoo : IFoo<int>
{
    int value;
    public IntFoo(int value)
    {
        this.value = value;
    }

    public int Method()
    {
        return value;
    }
}

public class StringFoo : IFoo<string>
{
    string value;
    public StringFoo(string value)
    {
        this.value = value;
    }

    public string Method()
    {
        return value;
    }
}

If you don't need to restrict it to just strings or ints (or don't want to) then something like this might work, or even be better:

public class Foo<T>
{
    private T value;
    public Foo(T value)
    {
        this.value = value;
    }

    public T Method()
    {
        return value;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Beat me to it! =] – rsbarro Dec 5 '12 at 21:52

No. This is not possible. You'd be better off creating an abstract class, and creating two separate classes inheriting from the Abstract Class. Refer to Abstract Design Pattern.

share|improve this answer
    
So if you had an abstract class what would go in the abstract class and what would go in the base class? The signatures are different, so you can't even define the abstract method in the base class. You'd just end up creating two different classes... – Servy Dec 5 '12 at 22:01

You may be better off using generics for your class. It's a bit less fluid than you're probably looking for (because you have to define the type in the class declaration), but accomplishes what you mainly want, I think.

public class SomeClass<T>
{
    public SomeClass(T value)
    {
    }

    public T Method() { return default(T); }
}

Which means that creating an instance of the class would use "new SomeClass(0);" rather than simply "new SomeClass(0);"

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