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I just want to work on my projects at home but I'm getting some problems as I'm using Access 2010 on a x64 Windows 7 OS while the MDB project has been done with Access 2003 on Windows XP x86.

I don't really want to convert the project to be x64 compatible, I would just like it to run in x86 mode on my computer.

Actually, I get errors when trying to import those functions:

Private Declare Function GetPrivateProfileString Lib "kernel32" Alias "GetPrivateProfileStringA" (ByVal lpApplicationName As String, ByVal lpKeyName As Any, ByVal lpDefault As String, ByVal lpReturnedString As String, ByVal nSize As Long, ByVal lpFileName As String) As Long
Private Declare Function WritePrivateProfileString Lib "kernel32" Alias "WritePrivateProfileStringA" (ByVal lpApplicationName As String, ByVal lpKeyName As Any, ByVal lpString As Any, ByVal lpFileName As String) As Long

Access says it must be updated to support 64 bits OS with some PtrSafe attribute. I don't really know what it does mean, but I know I would like it to work without any code modification but I don't find any option anywhere.

Any ideas? Thank you

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1  
    
Interesting read, thank you. To summarize, I can edit my declare statements a little bit to make those compatible both x86 and x64, or I can just install Office 32 bits instead of 64 bits on my home computer. –  dnLL Dec 6 '12 at 13:42
    
why not installing 32 bits office at home ? (even on a 64 bits os) The 64 bits version has not advantage, just lots of trouble –  iDevlop Dec 11 '12 at 20:03
    
Now that I know, I won't install anymore the 64-bits version. –  dnLL Dec 11 '12 at 20:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As HelloW already said: Just install the 32-bit version of Office.

It is worth pointing out that Microsoft recommends against using 64-bit Office unless you have a good reason for doing so.

Office Help says:

The 32-bit version of Office 2010 is the recommended option for most people, because it prevents potential compatibility issues with other 32-bit applications, specifically third-party add-ins that are available only for 32-bit operating systems.

The Microsoft Office 2010 Technology Guarantee FAQ says:

...we strongly recommend most users install 32-bit version of Office 2010 on both 32 and 64-bit Operating Systems because currently many common add-ins for Office will not function in the 64-bit edition. The 64-bit installation of Microsoft Office 2010 products will be available for users who commonly use very large documents or data set and need Excel 2010 programs to access greater than 2GB of memory.

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Thank you for pointing that out, really interesting read. –  dnLL Dec 11 '12 at 20:14

If you install x86 Office on your computer at home you shouldn't have any trouble. It is the X64 versions of Office that are the trouble.

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To summarize, I can edit my declare statements a little bit to make those compatible both x86 and x64, or I can just install Office 32 bits instead of 64 bits on my home computer. –  dnLL Dec 6 '12 at 14:02
    
@dnLL that is correct –  HelloW Dec 6 '12 at 14:04

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