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f21.Person1@373ee92

Ok the f21 represents the package. Person the class type.

Can anyone explain in simple terms WHY there is an "@" followed by random characters. And what the random chars stand for (position in the memory?).

I receive this when I do the following and HAVEN't declared a toString() method:

System.out.println(myObject);
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you dont Override the toString() method in your class, Object class's toString() will be invoked.

System.out.println(myObject);// this will call toString() by default.

Below is the Implementation of toString from java.Lang.Object class.

       The {@code toString} method for class {@code Object}
       returns a string consisting of the name of the class of which the
       object is an instance, the at-sign character `{@code @}', and
       the unsigned hexadecimal representation of the hash code of the
       object
 public String toString() {
   return getClass().getName() + "@" + Integer.toHexString(hashCode());
  }

so, apply the same to21.Person@373ee92:

21.Person(Fully qualified classname) + @ + 37ee92(hex version of the hasgcode)

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It invokes toString() implementation, if you haven't overriden this method then it will invoke Object's version which is implemented as follows

  public String toString() {
    return getClass().getName() + "@" + Integer.toHexString(hashCode());
  }

It is hex version of hashcode of that instance

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If you don't override the toString() method, the one provided by Object is used. It does the following:

The toString method for class Object returns a string consisting of the name of the class of which the object is an instance, the at-sign character @, and the unsigned hexadecimal representation of the hash code of the object. In other words, this method returns a string equal to the value of:

getClass().getName() + '@' + Integer.toHexString(hashCode())

The "random" characters are the hash code of your object, in hex.

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