Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to send a HTTP PUT (in order to create a new cache and populate it with my generated JSON) to ehCache using my webservice which is on the same local tomcat instance.

Am new to RESTful Web Services and am using JDK 1.6, Tomcat 7, ehCache, and JSON.

I have my POJOs defined like this:

Person POJO:

import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlRootElement;

@XmlRootElement
public class Person {
    private String firstName;
    private String lastName;
    private List<House> houses;

    // Getters & Setters
}

House POJO:

import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlRootElement;

@XmlRootElement
public class House {
    private String address;
    private String city;
    private String state;

    // Getters & Setters
}

Using a PersonUtil class, I hardcoded the POJOs as follows:

public class PersonUtil {
    public static Person getPerson() {
        Person person = new Person();
        person.setFirstName("John");
        person.setLastName("Doe");
        List<House> houses = new ArrayList<House>();
        House house = new House();
        house.setAddress("1234 Elm Street");
        house.setCity("Anytown");
        house.setState("Maine");
        houses.add(house);
        person.setHouses(houses);
        return person;
    }
}

Am able to create a JSON response per a GET request:

@Path("")
public class MyWebService{

     @GET
     @Produces(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON) 
     public Person getPerson() {
         return PersonUtil.getPerson();
     }
}

When deploying the war to tomcat and pointing the browser to

http://localhost:8080/personservice/

Generated JSON:

{ 
    "firstName" : "John", 
    "lastName" : "Doe",
    "houses": 
        [ 
            { 
              "address" : "1234 Elmstreet",
              "city"    : "Anytown",
              "state"   : "Maine"
            }
        ]
}

So far, so good, however, I have a different app which is running on the same tomcat instance (and has support for REST):

http://localhost:8080/ehcache/rest/

While tomcat is running, I can issue a PUT like this:

echo "Hello World" |  curl -S -T -  http://localhost:8080/ehcache/rest/hello/1

When I "GET" it like this:

 curl http://localhost:8080/ehcache/rest/hello/1

Will yield:

Hello World

What I need to do is create a POST which will put my entire Person generated JSON and create a new cache:

  http://localhost:8080/ehcache/rest/person

And when I do a "GET" on this previous URL, it should look like this:

{ 
    "firstName" : "John", 
    "lastName" : "Doe",
    "houses": 
        [ 
            { 
              "address" : "1234 Elmstreet",
              "city"    : "Anytown",
              "state"   : "Maine"
            }
        ]
}

So, far, this is what my PUT looks like:

@PUT
@Path("/ehcache/rest/person")
@Produces(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON)
@Consumes(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON) 
public Response createCache() {
    ResponseBuilder response = Response.ok(PersonUtil.getPerson(), MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON);
    return response.build();
}

Question(s):

  1. Is this the correct way to write the PUT?
  2. What should I write inside the createCache() method to have it PUT my generated JSON into http://localhost:8080/ehcache/rest/person?
  3. What would the command line CURL comment look like to use the PUT?
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

I would expect the PUT handler to take a Person as an argument so that it has some way to find out what was passed in to it. That's the JAX-RS way. I would also expect to not have to return a Response given that we're just doing a 200 OK response with a simple value.

@PUT
@Path("/ehcache/rest/person")
@Produces(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON)
@Consumes(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON) 
public Person createCache(Person who) {
    // Stuff in here to store the person, filling out with whatever
    // needs to be added...
    return who;
}

Of course, in general I'd also expect to be pulling a parameter from the path to indicate which person is being updated, and maybe also a @Context UriInfo uriInfo parameter to allow more detailed access to information about how the method was invoked (including the ability to synthesize related URLs). But that's finessing.

share|improve this answer

If you are looking for effective way of using PUT, you can refer to my blog post, where I also tried to mention difference between Post and Put http://ykshinde.wordpress.com/2014/12/05/rest-put-vs-post/

it also has code snippet to return appropriate HTTP code

hope it help.....

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.