Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I present to you all a program I'm working on for my college programming course. I still have a little ways to go before it completely meets my assignment's requirements, but I've gotten a basic draft of the program error-free (supposedly) and it appears to run… but then it suddenly kicks me into Xcode's debugger and gives me:

Thread 1: EXC_BAD_ACCESS(code=2, address=0x7fff95c1e5f5)

Here's the command line output, up until it kicks me out:

    -----------------------
    Quarterly_sales_taxator
    -----------------------


    How many company divisions will we be dealing with?  2


    Am I correct in assuming that there are 4 sales quarters?    yes



    Please enter the sales Company Division #1 brought in for Sales Quarter #1   20
    (lldb)

Here's my code:

    //
    //  quarterly_sales_taxator.cpp
    //  Ch. 7 program #7
    //
    //  Created by John Doe on 11/27/12.
    //

    #include <iostream>
    #include <iomanip>
    #include <string>
    #include <sstream>
    #include <cctype>
    using namespace std;

    void read_company_divisions_and_sales_quarters(double **, int, int);
        //void write_company_divisions_and_sales_quarters_to_array(double **, int, int);    // This will be used later on to read data from a file.
    void display_quarterly_sales_array(double **, int, int);

    string temp;    // A global temporary placeholder variable; I use this several times.


    int main()
    {
        int COMPANY_DIVISIONS,
            SALES_QUARTERS = 4;

        double **quarterly_sales_form;


        cout << "\n\n-----------------------\nQuarterly_sales_taxator\n-----------------------\n\n";

        cout << "\nHow many company divisions will we be dealing with?  ";
        getline(cin, temp);
        stringstream(temp)>>COMPANY_DIVISIONS;

        while (COMPANY_DIVISIONS < 1 || isdigit(COMPANY_DIVISIONS == false))
        {
            cout << "\n\n------"
                 << "\nError:"
                 << "\n------"
                 << "\n\nYou have entered an invalid choice."
                 << "\nPlease type a number greater than zero.    ";

            getline(cin, temp);
            stringstream(temp)>>COMPANY_DIVISIONS;
        }

        cout << "\n\nAm I correct in assuming that there are 4 sales quarters?    ";
        getline(cin, temp);

                // Convert to uppercase.
            for (int count = 0; count < temp.length(); count ++)
            {
                temp[count] = toupper(temp[count]);
            }

            if (temp == "NO" || temp == "NOPE" || temp == "INCORRECT" || temp == "YOU ARE NOT" || temp == "YOU ARE INCORRECT" || temp == "NEGATIVE" || temp == "NEGATORY")
            {
                cout << "\nOk, then how many sales quarters are we dealing with?    ";
                getline(cin, temp);
                stringstream(temp)>>SALES_QUARTERS;
            }

        cout << endl << endl;

            // This sets up the 2d array.
        quarterly_sales_form = new double *[COMPANY_DIVISIONS];
        for (int count = 0; count < COMPANY_DIVISIONS; count ++)
        {   quarterly_sales_form[COMPANY_DIVISIONS] = new double [SALES_QUARTERS];  }

        read_company_divisions_and_sales_quarters(quarterly_sales_form, COMPANY_DIVISIONS, SALES_QUARTERS);
            //  write_company_divisions_and_sales_quarters_to_array(quarterly_sales_form, COMPANY_DIVISIONS, SALES_QUARTERS);   // I'll add this feature later.


        cout << "\n\nHere's what you entered:\n\n";
        display_quarterly_sales_array(quarterly_sales_form, COMPANY_DIVISIONS, SALES_QUARTERS);

            // Since we used a series of pointers, we need to free the allocated space back up.
        for (int count = 0; count < COMPANY_DIVISIONS; count ++)
        {   delete[] quarterly_sales_form[COMPANY_DIVISIONS];  }
        delete[] quarterly_sales_form;



        return 0;
    }


    /*############################################
     # read_company_divisions_and_sales_quarters #
     ############################################*/
    void read_company_divisions_and_sales_quarters(double **array, int DIVISIONS, int QUARTERS)
    {

            for (int count = 0; count < QUARTERS; count++)
            {

                for (int index = 0; index < DIVISIONS; index++)
                {
                    cout << "\nPlease enter the sales Company Division #" << count+1 << " brought in for Sales Quarter #" << index+1 << "   ";
                    getline(cin, temp);
                    stringstream(temp) >> array[count][index];
                }
            }
    }


    /*################################
     # display_quarterly_sales_array #
     #################################*/
    void display_quarterly_sales_array(double **array, int DIVISIONS, int QUARTERS)
    {
        for (int count = 0; count < DIVISIONS; count++)
        {
            cout << "\nCompany division #" << count+1 << ":\n";
            for (int index = 0; index < QUARTERS; index++)
            {    cout << array[count][index] << ", ";    }
        }

    }

Can some kind soul please tell me what I'm doing wrong?

share|improve this question
1  
What line of code does the debugger say caused the problem? – Raymond Chen Dec 5 '12 at 22:42
5  
Welcome to Stack Overflow. This expression : isdigit(COMPANY_DIVISIONS == false) does not do what you think it does. – Robᵩ Dec 5 '12 at 22:44
    
Rob, I would normally agree with you, but for some reason it doesn't seem to work the way it should on in compiler I've used over the last few weeks. I don't understand why, but "!isdigit(variable)" hasn't worked for 2 months for me, on any machine I've used – clevertrever1 Dec 6 '12 at 6:12
    
Perhaps because you've been calling it on an int? isdigit takes a char and tells you whether that character represents one of the digits. It doesn't make sense to call it on an integer. – Dan Hulme Dec 6 '12 at 13:47
    
You're absolutely right, and the only reason it's called on an integer right now is that I've skipped several input validation checks that will be necessary only once the program is complete, so I pasted in the string stream as a quick reference point for later editing. The string itself will ultimately be checked, rather than an int – clevertrever1 Dec 6 '12 at 17:17
up vote 5 down vote accepted
    {   quarterly_sales_form[COMPANY_DIVISIONS] = new double [SALES_QUARTERS];  }

In this line, COMPANY_DIVISIONS should be count.

share|improve this answer
    
and at another place (when deleteing the elements) too. – n.m. Dec 5 '12 at 22:50
    
That's one bug, but there's a few others, some of which were mentioned by Dietmar Kühl; the code is also looping on the wrong variable(s). – Nik Bougalis Dec 5 '12 at 23:00
    
Wow… I'm speechless… It's obviously been far too long a day… Many thanks, sir! – clevertrever1 Dec 6 '12 at 6:19
    
Nik, thanks for catching that! – clevertrever1 Dec 6 '12 at 6:25

In addition to what Dan Hulme said, it seems this line

stringstream(temp) >> array[count][index];

should really be

std::istringstream(temp) >> std::skipws >> array[index][count];

In addition to using std::istringstream rather than std::stringstream and making sure that an lvalue is at hand, which isn't strictly needed until the type read becomes more interesting, this also reverses the indices: index runs over COMPANY_DIVISIONS and count over SALES_QUARTERS.

The real question is, of course: Who hands out assignments like this? Pointer manipulations and allocations are best left to low-level library writers. This is C++ not C: we can and should use abstractions. Getting this code exception safe is a major challenge and there is no point in teaching people how to write broken (e.g. exception unsafe) code.

share|improve this answer
    
Not just that, but the whole prompt thing looks like an example from an 80's BASIC textbook. User interaction just doesn't work this way any more. – Dan Hulme Dec 5 '12 at 23:05
    
Yeah, it's a very basic intro to programming course... – clevertrever1 Dec 6 '12 at 6:15
    
But, why would I use the std:: prefix when I've already #included the library? – clevertrever1 Dec 6 '12 at 6:16
    
Please don't misunderstand my reason for asking: I genuinely wish to learn from my mistakes and make advancement, I'm making no attempt to be confrontational. – clevertrever1 Dec 6 '12 at 6:33
    
By the way, thanks for catching that counter mixup! – clevertrever1 Dec 6 '12 at 6:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.