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Can I reflectively wire an event directly to another event in c#? Or is it necessary to code a physical method to raise the one event so that you can reflectively wire it to the other event?

I was thinking I would need to use GetRaiseMethod() so I wouldn't have to do that, but the docs say c# doesn't generate a raise method.

And if what I just asked seems totally off track for what I'm trying to do then please help me get on track. Basically I just want to look up two events reflectively and have one forward to the other.

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I'm not entirely sure what you mean by "reflectively". Can you provide non-working example code of what you'd like to see working? –  Bobson Dec 5 '12 at 23:13
1  
@Bobson see my answer for a working example –  Brandon Moore Dec 8 '12 at 10:45
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4 Answers 4

Assuming you have some event

class A
{
    public event EventHandler<MyEventArgs> MyEvent;
}

and some other event

class B
{
    public event EventHandler<MyEventArgs> MyOtherEvent;

and a method to raise that event

    protected void OnMyOtherEvent(MyEventArgs e)
    {
        var handler = MyEvent;
        if (handler != null)
            handler(this, e);
    }

then you can raise MyOtherEvent whenever MyEvent is raised as follows:

    public B(A a)
    {
        a.MyEvent += (sender, e) => OnMyOtherEvent(e);
    }
}

Note that you cannot simply add the MyOtherEvent delegates to the MyEvent event, as more MyOtherEvent delegates may be added after the fact. So you need some method in between.

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Thanks. I'm trying to do some MVC style programming with win forms though and on the top level I just wanna declare the events in my view and have the controller wire stuff up based on naming conventions and it'd be quite a drag to have to write an onEvent() method for every event. –  Brandon Moore Dec 6 '12 at 0:09
    
Your answer was exactly what I was trying to do, except I just needed to get at the delegate and invoke it reflectively to avoid having to physically write a method to invoke it. See my answer for the solution I finally figured out. –  Brandon Moore Dec 8 '12 at 10:44
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And if what I just asked seems totally off track for what I'm trying to do then please help me get on track. Basically I just want to look up two events reflectively and have one forward to the other.

An event isn't something that's "wired up" directly. You can use EventInfo.AddEventHandler to add a delegate as a new event handler for an event. This delegate could be anything, including a method that raises another event.

You would need a method which will raise your event, and an appropriate delegate for that method. Once you do that, you could add it as an event handler, and this will pass through correctly.

Or is it necessary to code a physical method to raise the one event so that you can reflectively wire it to the other event?

Yes, this is required. You can't just "hook up" two events - you need to have something (a method) which raises the second event.

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I understand that. But let's say I have an event called MyEvent. I could directly code "MyEvent.Invoke()" but it looks like there's no way to reflectively obtain that "Invoke()" method. Can you confirm? If not then it looks like I'll be learning how to Emit code soon. Thanks. –  Brandon Moore Dec 5 '12 at 23:43
    
@BrandonMoore Are you looking for EventInfo.RaiseMethod? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  Reed Copsey Dec 5 '12 at 23:46
    
I.e I want to do this reflectively: event1 += () => event2(); –  Brandon Moore Dec 5 '12 at 23:48
    
I thought I was, but then found out that c# and vb compilers don't generate this method and just return null when you call that function. –  Brandon Moore Dec 5 '12 at 23:51
    
Looks like maybe they changed that for framework 4.5. I'm on 4.0 though :( –  Brandon Moore Dec 5 '12 at 23:55
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is what I was looking for:

public event Action evt

public void RaiseEvent()
{
    var type = GetType();
    var fld = type.GetField("evt", BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance);
    var fldValue = (MulticastDelegate)fld.GetValue(this);
    fld.DynamicInvoke();
}
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You could raise the event calling the "On" method related to the event. Usually is implemented and it works as expected.

Here an example

Create an empty TextBox

        TextBox myTextBox = new TextBox();
        myTextBox.TextChanged += new EventHandler(myTextBox_TextChanged);

        void myTextBox_TextChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("something");
        }

raise the TextChange event

        MethodInfo mi = myTextBox.GetType().GetMethod("OnTextChanged", BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.NonPublic);
        try
        {
            mi.Invoke(myTextBox, new object[] { EventArgs.Empty });
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(ex);                
        }
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