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I know that this can be easily done by using

if(i%5 == 0 OR i%3 ==0) sum+=i;

But what is wrong in the following C#code:

    int sum = 0;
	for(int i = 0, j = 0; i < 1000; i+=3, j+=5)
	{
		Console.WriteLine("i = " + i);
		Console.WriteLine("j = " + j);

		sum += i;

		Console.WriteLine("Sum after adding i  = " + sum);

		if(j < 995 && j % 3 != 0)
		{
			sum += j;
		}

		Console.WriteLine("Sum after adding j  = " + sum);

	}
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Sorry about this. Did you initialize sum to 0? –  vpram86 Sep 3 '09 at 13:32
    
My bad.. :).. sorry! –  vpram86 Sep 3 '09 at 13:35
    
@wefwfwefwe you can start from anywhere. Would appreciate ANY feedback –  Sandbox Sep 3 '09 at 13:52
    
You should always start at the first bug. Here that is the for loop. –  starblue Sep 3 '09 at 14:42
    
@starblue what is the bug wrong with the loop? –  Sandbox Sep 3 '09 at 17:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The statement j < 995 should probably be j <= 995, otherwise you are not going to add 995 to your sum.

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yes. That is the issue. I should have figured it out myself. Thanks. –  Sandbox Sep 3 '09 at 13:39
    
j < 1000 would be a little more pure –  xan Sep 4 '09 at 13:18

The obvious bug is that 995 is a multiple of 5 that won't get added, while 996 and 999 are multiples of 3 that will be added: the 1000 in the loop condition and the 995 in the if condition should be the same number.

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Also, if you want to sum all such natural numbers less than 1000, why excluding 995? You could put

j <= 995 && j%3!=0
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This is just a nit-pick, maybe, but still: "All" and "lower than 1,000" is not the same set of natural numbers, you might want to change something.

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" it risks adding the same number more than once" . How? –  Sandbox Sep 3 '09 at 13:39
    
It doesn't, unwind is wrong about that. Your checks are sufficient to prevent adding the same number multiple times (although your loop design is unorthodox and a little confusing at first read). –  Tyler McHenry Sep 3 '09 at 13:45
for(int i = 0, j = 0; i < 15; i+=3, j+=5)

change this to

for(int i = 0, j = 0; i <= 15; i+=3, j+=5)

using the <= (greater than or equal to operator)

and it works

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