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I am looking for pythonic way to split a sentence into words, and also store the index information of all the words in a sentence e.g

a = "This is a sentence"
b = a.split() # ["This", "is", "a", "sentence"]

Now, I also want to store the index information of all the words

c = a.splitWithIndices() #[(0,3), (5,6), (8,8), (10,17)]

What is the best way to implement splitWithIndices(), does python have any library method that I can use for that. Any method that helps me calculate the indices of the word would be great.

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a.index(x) gives back the index of x. That could be used. –  Whymarrh Dec 5 '12 at 23:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I think it's more natural to return the start and end of the corresponding splices. eg (0, 4) instead of (0, 3)

>>> from itertools import groupby
>>> def splitWithIndices(s, c=' '):
...  p = 0
...  for k, g in groupby(s, lambda x:x==c):
...   q = p + sum(1 for i in g)
...   if not k:
...    yield p, q # or p, q-1 if you are really sure you want that
...   p = q
...
>>> a = "This is a sentence"
>>> list(splitWithIndices(a))
[(0, 4), (5, 7), (8, 9), (10, 18)]

>>> a[0:4]
'This'
>>> a[5:7]
'is'
>>> a[8:9]
'a'
>>> a[10:18]
'sentence'
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks!! Exactly what I was looking for –  user462455 Dec 6 '12 at 0:14

Here is a method using regular expressions:

>>> import re
>>> a = "This is a sentence"
>>> matches = [(m.group(0), (m.start(), m.end()-1)) for m in re.finditer(r'\S+', a)]
>>> matches
[('This', (0, 3)), ('is', (5, 6)), ('a', (8, 8)), ('sentence', (10, 17))]
>>> b, c = zip(*matches)
>>> b
('This', 'is', 'a', 'sentence')
>>> c
((0, 3), (5, 6), (8, 8), (10, 17))

As a one-liner:

b, c = zip(*[(m.group(0), (m.start(), m.end()-1)) for m in re.finditer(r'\S+', a)])

If you just want the indices:

c = [(m.start(), m.end()-1) for m in re.finditer(r'\S+', a)]
share|improve this answer
    
@f-j What does '*match' mean here? Thanks. –  zfz Dec 6 '12 at 3:37
    
That is called unpacking argument lists, or the splat operator. Basically foo(*[a, b]) will be equivalent to foo(a, b). –  Andrew Clark Dec 6 '12 at 7:52

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