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Say I have the following code:

try:
    print 'foo'
    # A lot more code...
    print 'bar'
except:
    pass

How would I for testing purposes disable the try-statement temporary?

You can't just comment the try and except lines out as the indention will still be off.

Isn't there any easier way than this?

#try:
print 'foo'
# A lot more code...
print 'bar'
#except:
#    pass
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3  
You should generally avoid having "A lot more code" inside a try: block in the first place. Usually you want just one line in there. –  wim Dec 5 '12 at 23:46
2  
This question makes no sense. You don't disable try statements for testing, you test whether it gets properly executed. If you mean testing as in some form of "prototyping", just move the code inside the try statement to a function and call the function directly. –  mmgp Dec 5 '12 at 23:50

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You could reraise the exception as the first line of your except block, which would behave just as it would without the try/except.

try:
    print 'foo'
    # A lot more code...
    print 'bar'
except:
    raise # was: pass
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Turn it into an if True statement, with the except clause 'commented out' by the else branch (which will never be executed):

if True: # try:
    # try suite statements
else: # except:
    # except suite statements

The else: is optional, you could also just comment out the whole except: suite, but by using else: you can leave the whole except: suite indented and uncommented.

So:

try:
    print 'foo'
    # A lot more code...
    print 'bar'
except SomeException as se:
    print 'Uhoh, got SomeException:', se.args[0]

becomes:

if True: # try:
    print 'foo'
    # A lot more code...
    print 'bar'
else: # except SomeException as se:
    print 'Uhoh, got SomeException:', se.args[0]
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Make your except only catch something that the try block won't throw:

class FakeError:
    pass

try:
    # code
except FakeError: # OldError:
    # catch

Not actually sure if this is a good idea, but it does work!

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Piggy-backing off of velotron's answer, I like the idea of doing something like this:

try:
    print 'foo'
    # A lot more code...
    print 'bar'
except:
    if settings.DEBUG:  # Use some boolean to represent dev state, such as DEBUG in Django
        raise           # Raise the error
    # Otherwise, handle and move on. 
    # Typically I want to log it rather than just pass.
    logger.exception("Something went wrong")
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