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From the documentation at http://code.google.com/p/autofac/wiki/MultitenantIntegration

Due to the relative complexity of this, it may be a better idea to isolate business logic into external dependencies that get passed into your controllers so the tenants can provide override dependencies rather than override controllers.

Let's say I have a default controller with many actions, the Index action gets full lists of data for products, inventory and stores. My TenantB wants the same controller with it's many actions, but for the Index action it also wants to get a list of sales.

It seems to me I might not need to override the whole controller for such a small change. Is this what the quoted sentence above is referring to? I could have some external methods that are injected into the Index, which for the default tenant would be a method that returns products, inventory and stores, while the TenantB would have an override for that method that also returned sales?

If my assumption is correct, does anyone know of some sample code somewhere that illustrates this type of implementation?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The idea behind that sentence is that you'd isolate the logic inside the Index action into a separate dependency.

That is, right now you probably have a controller something like this:

public class MyController : Controller
{
  protected IDataService _dataService;
  public MyController(IDataService dataService)
  {
    this._dataService = dataService;
  }
  public virtual ActionResult Index()
  {
    var data = this._dataService.GetData();
    var model = new IndexModel()
    {
      Data = data
    };
    return this.View(model);
  }
  public virtual ActionResult OtherAction()
  {
    // other stuff...
  }
}

In that Index action, you're getting the data and maybe doing some business logic on the data before you pass it along to the view.

Using a design like that, your tenant-specific need to get some additional data would mean you have to override the controller. That's not actually too hard, and if you decided to do property injection for the additional service dependencies, it should work.

public class TenantSpecificController : MyController
{
  // If you set up PropertiesAutowired on the tenant controller
  // registration, you'll get this property populated.
  public IOtherService OtherService { get; set; }
  public TenantSpecificController(IDataService dataService)
    : base(dataService)
  {
  }
  public override ActionResult Index()
  {
    var data = this._dataService.GetData();
    var otherData = this.OtherService.GetData();
    var model = new IndexModel()
    {
      Data = data
    };
    // You can't really change the model without changing the
    // view, so extended data goes in the ViewData or ViewBag
    this.ViewData["other"] = otherData;
    return this.View(model);
  }
}

But what that sentence in the doc is alluding to is that if you know you're going to have some fancy tenant override logic in that controller (more than just a one-off, since the controller override is easy in the one-off scenario) then pull the logic out of the controller, like this:

public class MyController : Controller
{
  protected IIndexModelGeneratorService _modelService;
  public MyController(IIndexModelGeneratorService modelService)
  {
    this._modelService = modelService;
  }
  public virtual ActionResult Index()
  {
    var model = this._modelService.BuildModel();
    return this.View(model);
  }
  public virtual ActionResult OtherAction()
  {
    // other stuff...
  }
}

Then instead of doing tenant overrides at the controller/action level, you're doing tenant overrides on specific services. You're pulling the business logic out of the controller into some other dependency.

Obviously that may mean changing the model to allow more extensible data...

public class IndexModel
{
  public DataObject Data { get; set; }
  public Dictionary<string, object> ExtendedData { get; set; }
}

...or maybe your data service implementation takes in a dictionary to populate:

public interface IIndexModelGenerator
{
  IndexModel BuildModel(ViewDataDictionary dict);
}

...so when you call it, your controller passes in the ViewData dictionary to capture the extra data:

var model = this._modelService.BuildModel(this.ViewData);

The idea still holds - if you'll have a lot of these, it may be easier to break out that business logic into multitenant components than it would to have different controllers per tenant.

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Thanks for such a detailed answer, it really helped me visualize how I can utilize such an extension in my project. –  Matt Dec 16 '12 at 21:52

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