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I am using postgresql on Heroku for my Django App. When I try making comment for my posts I sometimes get this error (again, sometimes not all the time).

Despite of the error, the comment is still saved, but all the code following the save() does not execute.

This problem only occurs on postgresql though. On my localhost where I am using sqlite, everything works just fine.

I am not sure what is the reason for this.

This is how my model looks like

class Comment(models.Model):
    post = models.ForeignKey(post)
    date = models.DateTimeField(auto_now_add=True)
    comment = models.TextField()
    comment_user = models.ForeignKey(User)

That is how my Comment model looks like. So is it because I did not add max_length for comment? Here is the Traceback

DatabaseError at /post/114/
value too long for type character varying(10)
Request Method: POST
Request URL:    http://www.mysite.com/post/114/
Django Version: 1.4.1
Exception Type: DatabaseError
Exception Value:    
value too long for type character varying(10)
Exception Location: /app/.heroku/venv/lib/python2.7/site-packages/django/db/backends/postgresql_psycopg2/base.py in execute, line 52
Python Executable:  /app/.heroku/venv/bin/python2.7
Python Version: 2.7.2
Python Path:    
['/app',
 '/app/.heroku/venv/bin',
 '/app/.heroku/venv/lib/python2.7/site-packages/pip-1.1-py2.7.egg',
 '/app/.heroku/venv/lib/python2.7/site-packages/distribute-0.6.31-py2.7.egg',
 '/app',
 '/app/.heroku/venv/lib/python27.zip',
 '/app/.heroku/venv/lib/python2.7',
 '/app/.heroku/venv/lib/python2.7/plat-linux2',
 '/app/.heroku/venv/lib/python2.7/lib-tk',
 '/app/.heroku/venv/lib/python2.7/lib-old',
 '/app/.heroku/venv/lib/python2.7/lib-dynload',
 '/usr/local/lib/python2.7',
 '/usr/local/lib/python2.7/plat-linux2',
 '/usr/local/lib/python2.7/lib-tk',
 '/app/.heroku/venv/lib/python2.7/site-packages',
 '/app/.heroku/venv/lib/python2.7/site-packages/PIL']
Server time:    Wed, 5 Dec 2012 20:41:39 -0600
share|improve this question
    
enable logging to see which query, exactly, is causing the error on what table, then work your way from there. –  vladr Dec 6 '12 at 2:40
    
I've added that as well. It doesnt seem to help much though –  Jonathan Dec 6 '12 at 2:42
    
AFAIK there's no point of making the char size anything less than 255; it should consume the same amount of disk space. –  Mark Dec 6 '12 at 2:54
1  
@Mark: Actually, there's little point to varchar(n) for any n with PostgreSQL, just use text unless you need a limit; PostgreSQL treats text, varchar, and varchar(n) the same internally (except for the length check on varchar(n)). –  mu is too short Dec 6 '12 at 3:17
1  
@Mark: MySQL has a whole bunch of string types with varying numbers of bytes for the length, I can't say about others. PostgreSQL uses 1 or 4 bytes for the length: "The storage requirement for a short string (up to 126 bytes) is 1 byte plus the actual string, which includes the space padding in the case of character. Longer strings have 4 bytes of overhead instead of 1. Long strings are compressed by the system automatically...". A byte or two isn't worth the hassle anymore :) –  mu is too short Dec 6 '12 at 4:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I can't help you with the Django parts (sorry) so I'll just speak PostgreSQL.

Somewhere in your application you have a varchar(10) column and you're trying to put something longer than 10 characters into it, you probably have a missing validation somewhere. SQLite ignores the size in a varchar(n) column and treats it as text which has no size limit; so you can do things like this with SQLite:

sqlite> create table t (s varchar(5));
sqlite> insert into t (s) values ('Where is pancakes house?');
sqlite> select * from t;
s
where is pancakes house?

with nary a complaint. Similarly, SQLite lets you do ridiculous things like putting a string into a numeric column.

This is what you need to do:

  1. Stop developing on SQLite when you're deploying on top of PostgreSQL. Install PostgreSQL locally and develop on top of that, you should even go so far as to install the same version of PostgreSQL that you'll be using at Heroku. There are all sorts of differences between databases that will cause you headaches, this little field size problem is just your gentle introduction to cross-database issues.
  2. Stop using varchar(n) with PostgreSQL, just use text. There's no point to using size limited string columns in PostgreSQL unless you have a hard requirement that the size must be limited. From the fine manual:

    The storage requirement for a short string (up to 126 bytes) is 1 byte plus the actual string, which includes the space padding in the case of character. Longer strings have 4 bytes of overhead instead of 1. Long strings are compressed by the system automatically, so the physical requirement on disk might be less. [...] If you desire to store long strings with no specific upper limit, use text...

    Tip: There is no performance difference among these three types, apart from increased storage space when using the blank-padded type, and a few extra CPU cycles to check the length when storing into a length-constrained column. While character(n) has performance advantages in some other database systems, there is no such advantage in PostgreSQL; in fact character(n) is usually the slowest of the three because of its additional storage costs. In most situations text or character varying should be used instead.

    So don't bother with traditional char and varchar in PostgreSQL unless you have to, just use text.

  3. Start validating your incoming data so ensure that it doesn't violate any size or format constraints you have.

You can switch your columns from varchar(n) to text immediately and keep working with SQLite while you get PostgreSQL up and running; both databases will be happy with text for strings of unlimited length and this simple fix will get you past your immediate problem. Then, as soon as you can, switch your development environment to PostgreSQL so that you can catch problems like this before your code hits production.

share|improve this answer
    
It even happens when I add only a "hi" in comments. and it just happens sometimes. Other times even if a paragraph is written no error would show up –  Jonathan Dec 6 '12 at 4:44
    
@Jonathan: You need to get more information about the error then. Do you even have a varchar(10) anywhere? Are you perhaps using a string to hold a date that is supposed to be in ISO 8601 format (yyyy-mm-dd)? –  mu is too short Dec 6 '12 at 5:13
    
I've added my model in the question too,please have a look at it. and no I dont think I am not using a string to hold date. –  Jonathan Dec 6 '12 at 6:13
    
Can you include the SQL schema for the corresponding table? Use .schema table_name in SQLite or \d table_name in psql. –  mu is too short Dec 6 '12 at 6:18
    
I finally found the problem. It was actually another model that had a CharField wit max_length=10. And I was trying to manipulate that field in my Code as well. So that was causing all the confusion. –  Jonathan Dec 6 '12 at 7:44

The reason is that PostgreSQL actually checks the lengths of the data against the size of the field and errors out if too large, whereas SQLite completely ignores the specified field size, and MySQL silently truncates the data destroying it irretrievably. Make the field larger.

share|improve this answer
    
Right, my bad . –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Dec 6 '12 at 3:33
    
I've added my model as well. Can you please look at it and let me know if it is because I did not add max_length for comment? –  Jonathan Dec 6 '12 at 4:41
    
I finally found the problem. It was actually another model that had a CharField wit max_length=10. And I was trying to manipulate that field in my Code as well. So that was causing all the confusion. –  Jonathan Dec 6 '12 at 7:45

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